Finding the right doctor the key to conquering pain

One of the greatest challenges people with pain face is access to appropriate care. Although chronic pain disables more than 50 million Americans, chronic pain sufferers are among the most undertreated patients in the United States. According to The National Pain Foundation, pain accounts for 80 percent of all physician visits, yet sufferers are often shuffled from one health care provider to another without relief. "Pain patients wrongly believe that pain is something they must accept as part of their lives - that it's associated with their injury, that it's part of their disease or that it's a natural part of growing older," said Dr. Robert L. Tiso of the New York Pain Center. "What they need to realize is that pain isn't something they have to accept. They can find relief with proper pain management.

" Pain physicians recommend patients take control of their pain by researching pain and pain management options and by seeking a referral to a pain specialist who knows how to treat pain effectively. Pain physicians focus on the evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation of persons in pain. Some pain physicians work with one therapy while others are multidisciplinary and offer a number of different treatments, which range from medication management to advanced therapies like spinal cord stimulation. Several resources are available to help patients find a pain physician and learn about treatment options. Once patients have identified a pain physician, they can take several steps to prepare for their visit: * Check to see that the pain provider is in your insurance network. * Find out if the pain clinic requires a referral. * Visit paintyourpain. com to create and print a "map" of your pain. * Gather your medical records for your visit. "The best advice I have for other pain suffers is to seek specialized help," said Michelle Revello, a chronic pain sufferer who was treated effectively by a pain management specialist. "We all call in expert help for trivial household inconveniences like a leaky sink. We should all do the same for our bodies."

Cancer awareness the facts about pain management

Managing Pain in Cancer Patients Besides the usual fears, the announcement that you or a loved one has cancer creates a frightening and complex situation concerning the pain the patient will suffer during treatment. No one wants to suffer unduly, so this pain has to be properly managed. The new field of pain management becomes a very important part of the treatment of a cancer patient. There are now medical specialists who determine the most effective management in each case, and there are many different approaches to pain management today, so each plan is individualized. It is now considered a misconception that having cancer automatically means a great deal of pain in the treatment. With today's pain management techniques, this has become a complete fallacy. Before, people frequently felt they just had to learn to deal with the pain, now no one needs to adjust to pain any longer. Once a patient is open and communicative about his pain, the team can find relief for the patient. The patient needs to let the experts decide which steps to take to alleviate the pain. Normally, your doctor will be very sensitive to your pain and discomfort. However, if you feel your doctor does not seem to have a solution to the pain you or your loved one is experiencing, it is important to meet with someone who specializes in the area of pain management. These often include the oncologist , the cancer treatment specialist, who is a member of a pain management team. Some other medical specialists who work in this area are neurologists and anesthesiologists. A neurologist deals with the entire nervous system, the area of the body that signals pain, and an anesthesiologist has the expertise to deal with pain management during surgery. It's important to recognize that pain management is part of the overall process for treating cancer patients. This isn't a luxury, or something that's introduced only when the pain becomes completely intolerable. A good doctor will want to be informed about any pain or discomfort, from the moment that it's experienced. As time goes on, medications and/or other pain management approaches may need to be changed, so it's critical that you keep the lines of communication open in order to receive the relief that you need. Once a pain management technique has been identified, the patient should follow it closely. The patient should not try to "tough it out" by holding out and lengthening times between doses. The doctor or pain management team has prescribed what they believe to be the appropriate course of treatment for relief, so postponing doses will throw off this program. In many cases, this so called bravery only forces people to increase the dosage to compensate for the greater level of pain. Let the members of your medical team decide the proper dosage to control pain from the very beginning. Gradually increasing or decreasing treatment is the concept behind pain management. If your concern is that you'll become addicted or immune to the pain medication, or that the side effects will cause you to change your behavior and lose control of yourself, speak with your doctor. This isn't the case, and those who work closely with your pain management know exactly what's necessary without risking other areas of your health. For more information about pain management, contact the American Cancer Society or the National Cancer Institute. Medical professionals are always on hand to assist you with questions and concerns about all facets of the disease, including the management of pain.

Cancer awareness the facts about pain management

Managing Pain in Cancer Patients Besides the usual fears, the announcement that you or a loved one has cancer creates a frightening and complex situation concerning the pain the patient will suffer during treatment. No one wants to suffer unduly, so this pain has to be properly managed. The new field of pain management becomes a very important part of the treatment of a cancer patient. There are now medical specialists who determine the most effective management in each case, and there are many different approaches to pain management today, so each plan is individualized. It is now considered a misconception that having cancer automatically means a great deal of pain in the treatment. With today's pain management techniques, this has become a complete fallacy. Before, people frequently felt they just had to learn to deal with the pain, now no one needs to adjust to pain any longer. Once a patient is open and communicative about his pain, the team can find relief for the patient. The patient needs to let the experts decide which steps to take to alleviate the pain. Normally, your doctor will be very sensitive to your pain and discomfort. However, if you feel your doctor does not seem to have a solution to the pain you or your loved one is experiencing, it is important to meet with someone who specializes in the area of pain management. These often include the oncologist , the cancer treatment specialist, who is a member of a pain management team. Some other medical specialists who work in this area are neurologists and anesthesiologists. A neurologist deals with the entire nervous system, the area of the body that signals pain, and an anesthesiologist has the expertise to deal with pain management during surgery. It's important to recognize that pain management is part of the overall process for treating cancer patients. This isn't a luxury, or something that's introduced only when the pain becomes completely intolerable. A good doctor will want to be informed about any pain or discomfort, from the moment that it's experienced. As time goes on, medications and/or other pain management approaches may need to be changed, so it's critical that you keep the lines of communication open in order to receive the relief that you need. Once a pain management technique has been identified, the patient should follow it closely. The patient should not try to "tough it out" by holding out and lengthening times between doses. The doctor or pain management team has prescribed what they believe to be the appropriate course of treatment for relief, so postponing doses will throw off this program. In many cases, this so called bravery only forces people to increase the dosage to compensate for the greater level of pain. Let the members of your medical team decide the proper dosage to control pain from the very beginning. Gradually increasing or decreasing treatment is the concept behind pain management. If your concern is that you'll become addicted or immune to the pain medication, or that the side effects will cause you to change your behavior and lose control of yourself, speak with your doctor. This isn't the case, and those who work closely with your pain management know exactly what's necessary without risking other areas of your health. For more information about pain management, contact the American Cancer Society or the National Cancer Institute. Medical professionals are always on hand to assist you with questions and concerns about all facets of the disease, including the management of pain.

Pain management for cancer patients

Cancer Awareness: The Facts About Pain Management The announcement that you or a loved one has cancer creates a frightening and complex situation. Besides the usual fears is the concern that the patient will suffering a lot of pain during treatment. You want to make sure that this pain can be properly managed so that you or the loved one does not suffer unduly. Pain management becomes a very important part of the entire treatment of a cancer patient. Luckily, there are many different approaches to pain management, and there are now medical specialists who can help determine the most effective in each case. That is now a big misconception, that having cancer will automatically mean a great deal of pain in the treatment. People frequently feel they just have to learn to deal with it. With today's pain management techniques, this has become a complete fallacy. No-one needs to adjust to pain any longer. If a patient is open and communicative about the pain they are experiencing, his pain management team will be able to find relief for the patient. There are a number of ways to manage pain, and the patient needs to let the experts decide which steps to take to alleviate it. Normally, your doctor will be very sensitive to your pain and discomfort. However, if you feel your doctor does not seem to have a solution to the pain you or your loved one is experiencing, it is important to meet with someone who specializes in the area of pain management. These often include the oncologist , the cancer treatment specialist, who is a member of a pain management team. Some other medical specialists who work in this area are neurologists and anesthesiologists. A neurologist deals with the entire nervous system, the area of the body that signals pain, and an anesthesiologist has the expertise to deal with pain management during surgery. It's important to recognize that pain management is part of the overall process for treating cancer patients. This isn't a luxury, or something that's introduced only when the pain becomes completely intolerable. A good doctor will want to be informed about any pain or discomfort, from the moment that it's experienced. As time goes on, medications and/or other pain management approaches may need to be changed, so it's critical that you keep the lines of communication open in order to receive the relief that you need. The patient should follow the pain managegment plan closely once a pain management technique has been identified. Under no circumstances should the patient try to "tough it out" by holding out and lengthening times between doses. The pain management team has designed what they believe to be the appropriate course of treatment for relief, and postponing doses throws off course. In many cases, people increase the dosage to compensate for the greater level of pain, so this so called bravery only makes matters worse. Gradually increasing or decreasing treatment is the concept behind pain management. Allow the members of your medical team to decide the proper dosage to control pain. Many patients are concerned that they will become addicted or immune to the medication, so they resist the idea of pain medication. Another reason is that they fear side effects. You should consult your doctor if these concern you. As long as you follow the program and are monitored, he will assure you that there should be no concerns. For more information about pain management, contact the American Cancer Society or the National Cancer Institute. Medical professionals are always on hand to assist you with questions and concerns about all facets of the disease, including the management of pain.

Pain management for cancer patients

Cancer Awareness: The Facts About Pain Management The announcement that you or a loved one has cancer creates a frightening and complex situation. Besides the usual fears is the concern that the patient will suffering a lot of pain during treatment. You want to make sure that this pain can be properly managed so that you or the loved one does not suffer unduly. Pain management becomes a very important part of the entire treatment of a cancer patient. Luckily, there are many different approaches to pain management, and there are now medical specialists who can help determine the most effective in each case. That is now a big misconception, that having cancer will automatically mean a great deal of pain in the treatment. People frequently feel they just have to learn to deal with it. With today's pain management techniques, this has become a complete fallacy. No-one needs to adjust to pain any longer. If a patient is open and communicative about the pain they are experiencing, his pain management team will be able to find relief for the patient. There are a number of ways to manage pain, and the patient needs to let the experts decide which steps to take to alleviate it. Normally, your doctor will be very sensitive to your pain and discomfort. However, if you feel your doctor does not seem to have a solution to the pain you or your loved one is experiencing, it is important to meet with someone who specializes in the area of pain management. These often include the oncologist , the cancer treatment specialist, who is a member of a pain management team. Some other medical specialists who work in this area are neurologists and anesthesiologists. A neurologist deals with the entire nervous system, the area of the body that signals pain, and an anesthesiologist has the expertise to deal with pain management during surgery. It's important to recognize that pain management is part of the overall process for treating cancer patients. This isn't a luxury, or something that's introduced only when the pain becomes completely intolerable. A good doctor will want to be informed about any pain or discomfort, from the moment that it's experienced. As time goes on, medications and/or other pain management approaches may need to be changed, so it's critical that you keep the lines of communication open in order to receive the relief that you need. The patient should follow the pain managegment plan closely once a pain management technique has been identified. Under no circumstances should the patient try to "tough it out" by holding out and lengthening times between doses. The pain management team has designed what they believe to be the appropriate course of treatment for relief, and postponing doses throws off course. In many cases, people increase the dosage to compensate for the greater level of pain, so this so called bravery only makes matters worse. Gradually increasing or decreasing treatment is the concept behind pain management. Allow the members of your medical team to decide the proper dosage to control pain. Many patients are concerned that they will become addicted or immune to the medication, so they resist the idea of pain medication. Another reason is that they fear side effects. You should consult your doctor if these concern you. As long as you follow the program and are monitored, he will assure you that there should be no concerns. For more information about pain management, contact the American Cancer Society or the National Cancer Institute. Medical professionals are always on hand to assist you with questions and concerns about all facets of the disease, including the management of pain.

Pain management

Even the word "pain" hurts to those of us who endure levels of pain each day. Pain management is what the doctors tell us to do. This sounds great in theory, but what does it mean, and how does one go about doing it? These are excellent questions. It probably sounds "logical", but the better you are at describing your pain to others, the better you can get help in managing pain. And, pain management is the key! The best way to document and comunicate pain is to use what I call a "pain" scale. I set this up in what I call a "matrix", where I have a chart with four columns as follows: The left column is for pain "level", from "0" being "NO PAIN" (right, like that's gonna happen!) and "10" being so painful that NOTHING YOU DO seems to decrease the pain level. In the next column, you describe the pain at different levels. I use the following: 0 = No pain; 02 = low levels of pain, an Over the Counter (OTC) remedy can get rid of it; 04 = moderate pain, need double the strength of the OTC remedy to dull the pain; 06 = heavy moderate pain, need double the strength of OTC remedy, but the pain isn't dulled, and activities are curtailed (decreased); 08 = heavy pain, need something stronger than an OTC remedy, and one must sit/lie still; and, finally, level 10. The next column is the most important one, where you describe specifically what the pain feels like, and use many VERY SPECIFIC examples of how this specific level of pain impacts your "normal daily living activities". I cannot stress how important it is to be as specific, and as complete with your examples as you can be. Also, you need to "guesstimate" the % of time a day/week that you "routinely" have this pain. Here are some examples that I use: 02 - The low levels of pain are primarily headaches and backaches. I can take an OTC remedy, and rest for about 30 minutes, and the pain goes away. This level of pain comes about 2X a week, and only lasts for the 30 minutes until the OTC remedy kicks in. This level of pain does not keep me from doing my daily activities. BUT, I need to get on this level of pain immediately, or it will increase in level if not addressed and removed. 04 - This level of pain occurs in my hands, arms, legs, feet, and head. It is like the muscles are hurting, and the joints hurt. This level gets my attention; I take double the advised level of OTC remedy, and get some hot tea, and rest lying down. This level usually takes about an hour to "manage", and I have to stop whatever I am doing to lie down until I get it under control. This level occurs about 10% of the time, every other day, usually in the evening. This level makes me depressed, and when depressed, the level of pain often increases to the 08 level. 08 - I usually go straight from 04 to 08, skipping the 06 level. This level is incapacitating. It feels like the worst flu you have ever had, where EVERY muscle and joint in my body hurts! Even my teeth and scalp hurt. Light hurts my eyes; sound hurts my ears; movement makes me nauseous. I take triple the OTC remedy, and a hot shower. I have a stool in the shower where I can sit and let the hot water shower down on me until I run out of hot water (I do this after I take the meds, and try to stay in the shower until I feel the pain beginning to receed). When out of the shower, I have room temperature ginger ale (hot or cold liquids hurt my head), and lie down with soft music - no words; with a cool washcloth over my eyes in a darkened room. This level of pain occurs 2 or 3 times a week, and lasts for about 20 - 30% of the day. I cannot function in any activity at this level of pain. When the meds kick in, the pain is only reduced to the 04 or 02 level. 10 - at this level, no OTC remedy helps; the shower doesn't help; nothing helps; the pain is just reduced to the 08 level. Need greater help than an OTC remedy. This level occurs about one time each week, and literally knocks me out. Now for the last column, and, this one is very important for long term pain management. In this column, you document what, SPECIFICALLY you were doing just before this level of pain was triggered! This will help both you and your Doctor determine what will help you. For me, the doctor really noticed the comment about depression linked with pain, and the comments about taking "above recommended" levels of an OTC remedy. He prescribed for me an anti-depressant, and a pain medication in lieu of the OTC remedy. These meds, in conjunction with the meds for joint pain and for the tingling pains, allows for me to regain some of the normal daily living activities. Good luck for you in documenting your pain levels!

Pain management

Even the word "pain" hurts to those of us who endure levels of pain each day. Pain management is what the doctors tell us to do. This sounds great in theory, but what does it mean, and how does one go about doing it? These are excellent questions. It probably sounds "logical", but the better you are at describing your pain to others, the better you can get help in managing pain. And, pain management is the key! The best way to document and comunicate pain is to use what I call a "pain" scale. I set this up in what I call a "matrix", where I have a chart with four columns as follows: The left column is for pain "level", from "0" being "NO PAIN" (right, like that's gonna happen!) and "10" being so painful that NOTHING YOU DO seems to decrease the pain level. In the next column, you describe the pain at different levels. I use the following: 0 = No pain; 02 = low levels of pain, an Over the Counter (OTC) remedy can get rid of it; 04 = moderate pain, need double the strength of the OTC remedy to dull the pain; 06 = heavy moderate pain, need double the strength of OTC remedy, but the pain isn't dulled, and activities are curtailed (decreased); 08 = heavy pain, need something stronger than an OTC remedy, and one must sit/lie still; and, finally, level 10. The next column is the most important one, where you describe specifically what the pain feels like, and use many VERY SPECIFIC examples of how this specific level of pain impacts your "normal daily living activities". I cannot stress how important it is to be as specific, and as complete with your examples as you can be. Also, you need to "guesstimate" the % of time a day/week that you "routinely" have this pain. Here are some examples that I use: 02 - The low levels of pain are primarily headaches and backaches. I can take an OTC remedy, and rest for about 30 minutes, and the pain goes away. This level of pain comes about 2X a week, and only lasts for the 30 minutes until the OTC remedy kicks in. This level of pain does not keep me from doing my daily activities. BUT, I need to get on this level of pain immediately, or it will increase in level if not addressed and removed. 04 - This level of pain occurs in my hands, arms, legs, feet, and head. It is like the muscles are hurting, and the joints hurt. This level gets my attention; I take double the advised level of OTC remedy, and get some hot tea, and rest lying down. This level usually takes about an hour to "manage", and I have to stop whatever I am doing to lie down until I get it under control. This level occurs about 10% of the time, every other day, usually in the evening. This level makes me depressed, and when depressed, the level of pain often increases to the 08 level. 08 - I usually go straight from 04 to 08, skipping the 06 level. This level is incapacitating. It feels like the worst flu you have ever had, where EVERY muscle and joint in my body hurts! Even my teeth and scalp hurt. Light hurts my eyes; sound hurts my ears; movement makes me nauseous. I take triple the OTC remedy, and a hot shower. I have a stool in the shower where I can sit and let the hot water shower down on me until I run out of hot water (I do this after I take the meds, and try to stay in the shower until I feel the pain beginning to receed). When out of the shower, I have room temperature ginger ale (hot or cold liquids hurt my head), and lie down with soft music - no words; with a cool washcloth over my eyes in a darkened room. This level of pain occurs 2 or 3 times a week, and lasts for about 20 - 30% of the day. I cannot function in any activity at this level of pain. When the meds kick in, the pain is only reduced to the 04 or 02 level. 10 - at this level, no OTC remedy helps; the shower doesn't help; nothing helps; the pain is just reduced to the 08 level. Need greater help than an OTC remedy. This level occurs about one time each week, and literally knocks me out. Now for the last column, and, this one is very important for long term pain management. In this column, you document what, SPECIFICALLY you were doing just before this level of pain was triggered! This will help both you and your Doctor determine what will help you. For me, the doctor really noticed the comment about depression linked with pain, and the comments about taking "above recommended" levels of an OTC remedy. He prescribed for me an anti-depressant, and a pain medication in lieu of the OTC remedy. These meds, in conjunction with the meds for joint pain and for the tingling pains, allows for me to regain some of the normal daily living activities. Good luck for you in documenting your pain levels!

Physical therapy as alternative pain relief

Many people suffer from chronic pain due to health conditions such as arthritis and menstrual cramps. while others experience acute pain as a result of injury or surgery. If you're a pain sufferer, you have plenty of options to ease those pains. While most pain relief medications come in the form of a pill, there are a number of alternative pain relief treatments such as snake oil which is now sold various shapes and sizes. However, before trying any of these pain relief approaches, always make it a point to consult with your doctor. Some alternative pain relief therapies may not be appropriate for you or may have serious side effects, even if they are of the non-pharmaceutical type. There are factors to be considered including medical condition as well as patient history before undergoing any treatment.

Bear in mind that not all available options are perfect alternative pain relief treatments. While a certain pain relief may work to some people, the same remedy may not work with others. There are some pain relievers that do not provide complete pain relief. You may have to try a number of different strategies and combine some of them before finding an acceptable level of pain relief. As with any treatment, there may also be risks and side effects.

Many people would do anything to find a relief for their pains. One of the advantages of trying out a number of alternative pain relief remedies is that you may find a pain relief treatment that works for you. Penney Cowan, executive director and founder of the American Chronic Pain Association advises pain sufferers to take an active part in their own rehabilitation. People should learn pain management and to know their role in how to regain control of their life in order to live with the pain which seems to have taken over. While there is no specific cure to pain, physical therapy is very effective alternative pain relief and highly recommended. Hayes Wilson, MD, chief rheumatologist at Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta and national medical adviser to the Arthritis Foundation, recommends physical therapy to almost all his patients because it teaches people how to take care of themselves. He believes in the clichй, “give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man how to fish, and feed him for life.” Physical therapists are like fishing instructors who teach patients the self-management skills of pain management. Therapists encourage arthritis patients how to deal with pain in a day-to-day basis by showing them how to build up strength and improve range of motion, and how to make sensible decisions about activities to prevent arthritic flare-ups. However, keep in mind that physical therapy is not intended to act as an elixir for pain, but rather, as an alternative pain relief treatment. In the case of patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis, which can take 10 to 15 years off a patient's life, physical therapy serves only as a supplement to immune-modulating drugs. While physical therapy can help decrease inflammation in osteoarthritis, the condition could worsen if swelling isn't fully addressed with the appropriate medicines.

Fact sheet aspirin a trusted brand

Fact Sheet: ASPIRIN® - a Trusted Brand Acetylsalicylic acid, or ASA, the active ingredient in ASPIRIN® was launched on the German market under the trademark ASPIRIN® in 1899. Today, ASPIRIN® is a registered trademark of Bayer AG in Germany and in more than 80 other countries. With its history, ASPIRIN® has earned the trust of citizens and medical communities worldwide. ASPIRIN®'s mechanism of action has been thoroughly documented and described over the years. Pain Management ASPIRIN® is indicated for over-the-counter treatment of acute pain. It is recommended for the relief of headache, pain and fever of colds and flu, muscle aches and pains, menstrual pains and toothaches. ASPIRIN®, as an over-the-counter medication, is indicated for the temporary relief of minor aches and pains of arthritis. ASPIRIN® relieves the burning pain of arthritis inflammation right at the site. Doctors may recommend ASPIRIN® for other types of pain management. Talk to your doctor to determine if ASPIRIN® is right for you. Long Term Preventative Therapy Coated ASPIRIN® Daily Low Dose is doctor recommended for daily therapy. Coated ASPIRIN® Daily Low Dose contains a special formulation of ASA. Other ingredients such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen that are meant to relieve pain do not have the same action as Coated ASPIRIN® Daily Low Dose. Doctors say it's okay to take more ASPIRIN® for pain relief if using ASPIRIN® for doctor supervised preventative therapy.*1 * As with any medication, speak to your doctor or pharmacist before using. 1 - Data on file.

Fact sheet aspirin a trusted brand

Fact Sheet: ASPIRIN® - a Trusted Brand Acetylsalicylic acid, or ASA, the active ingredient in ASPIRIN® was launched on the German market under the trademark ASPIRIN® in 1899. Today, ASPIRIN® is a registered trademark of Bayer AG in Germany and in more than 80 other countries. With its history, ASPIRIN® has earned the trust of citizens and medical communities worldwide. ASPIRIN®'s mechanism of action has been thoroughly documented and described over the years. Pain Management ASPIRIN® is indicated for over-the-counter treatment of acute pain. It is recommended for the relief of headache, pain and fever of colds and flu, muscle aches and pains, menstrual pains and toothaches. ASPIRIN®, as an over-the-counter medication, is indicated for the temporary relief of minor aches and pains of arthritis. ASPIRIN® relieves the burning pain of arthritis inflammation right at the site. Doctors may recommend ASPIRIN® for other types of pain management. Talk to your doctor to determine if ASPIRIN® is right for you. Long Term Preventative Therapy Coated ASPIRIN® Daily Low Dose is doctor recommended for daily therapy. Coated ASPIRIN® Daily Low Dose contains a special formulation of ASA. Other ingredients such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen that are meant to relieve pain do not have the same action as Coated ASPIRIN® Daily Low Dose. Doctors say it's okay to take more ASPIRIN® for pain relief if using ASPIRIN® for doctor supervised preventative therapy.*1 * As with any medication, speak to your doctor or pharmacist before using. 1 - Data on file.

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Acupuncture for Pain Relief It's amazing the number of people who live with pain on a regular basis. For some people, the pain is something that they simply live with but it does not alter their life necessarily. For others, the pain gets quite intense and they have to live around the pain instead of simply incorporating it into their lifestyle. One thing that almost all pain has in common, however, is an imbalance that exists in our body. If we were to bring our body back into line with where it should be, most of the pain that we feel would stop happening. Although there are many different ways for people to deal with pain that range from prescription medications to therapeutic exercise, one way that is often overlooked is acupuncture. The fact is, acupuncture is able to help with pain in a lot of different ways and to help individuals to get over pain or to be able to reduce it so that it is easily manageable. How is acupuncture able to do this? It does this by bringing our body back into balance with where it should be. Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years in Asia and is now becoming very popular in the Western world. It is based on the principle that we all have an energy which is referred to as Chi. It is a balanced energy that exists in between two extremes, the negative and positive. If all things in our body or balanced, according to these theories, then we can enjoy good health. Acupuncture is a way of manipulating the energy that flows through our body and brings us back into a balanced state. What kind of pain can be controlled by acupuncture? People actually visit acupuncturists for a wide variety of pain that includes lower back pain, headaches, arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. It is also very common for people to visit the doctor before and after surgery for additional pain management. So not only is acupuncture good for the relief of pain, it also may help with the prevention of pain as well. As acupuncture continues to grow a popularity and additional testing helps to prove what it can do for us, more people will use these treatments in order to deal with their ill health. By bringing us back into a balanced state naturally, acupuncture is able to allow us to heal from the inside out.

Formula d racing series events and venues

Formula D Racing Series Events and Venues Formula D Racing, also commonly referred as a Formula Drifting, is a popular sport. That sport has recently started gaining popularity in the United States. In fact, a few years ago, a professional drifting series was created. This group of drivers and the series that they race in is sometimes referred to the Formula Drift Championship. In the Formula Drift Championship, around fifty drivers compete to be known as the best professional drifter in the United States. Like all other professional racing events, these events take place in a series of different locations, namely professional race tracks. When it comes to all racing events, including Formula D Racing, you will find that it is hard to examine all of the different racing venues. This is because they tend to change. As Formula D continues to rise in popularity, there is a good chance that additional tracks will be added, in the years to come. However, you if you interested in learning more about the tracks which have already hosted an event, you are advised to pick a season and research those specific venues. For this article, we will focus on the 2006 Formula Drifting season. Atlanta, Georgia is one of the stops on the Formula Drifting series. Their events take place on Road Atlanta. Road Atlanta is known as one of the best road courses in the United States. In fact, it is also known on a worldly level. In 2004, the staff at Road Atlanta added another horseshoe turn just for the Formula Drifting series. This new paved turn helps to add extra excitement to the events being hosted at Road Atlanta. In addition to Formula D Racing, Road Atlanta is also home to a number of other popular racing events. These events include, but are not limited to the AMA Suzuki Superbike Showdown, the Audi Driving Experience, and the Kevin Schwantz Suzuki School. The Formula Drift series also makes a stop in Sonoma, California. That stop is to the Infineon Raceway. The Infineon Raceway is popular due to its location. It is located near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco; in fact, it is located only thirty miles from there. In addition to the Formula Drift series, the Infineon Raceway is also home to a number of other popular racing events. These events include, but are not limited to, NASCAR, drag racing, and the AMA Superbike tour. Unlike the above mentioned tracks, Formula Drifting also takes place at Solider Field in Chicago, Illinois. If you are familiar with Soldier Field, the football stadium, you may be wondering how drifting can take place there. Despite what you may believe, the event does not actually take place inside the stadium; instead it takes place outside of it, in the parking lot. During the Formula Drift event, the lot is transformed into an amazing drifting course. Although it may not be on a track, the excitement is still the same, if not better. One of the reasons why this event is so popular is because, aside from New Jersey, Formula D Racing usually does not usually come up to the mid or upper north east area. In addition to the above mentioned venues, the Formula Drift series also makes stops in Long Beach and Irwindale, California, Seattle, Washington, and Wall, New Jersey. In Wall, New Jersey, the action takes place at the Air Force Reserve Wall Speedway. In Long Beach California, the action takes place in the Streets of Long Beach. In Irwindale, California, the events take place at the Irwindale Speedway. As you can see, a number of these events are hosted at well-known racetracks and others are hosted in other locations, such as city streets or parking lots. As previously mentioned, the above mentioned venues were on the 2006 Formula Drifting circuit. In the future, additional stops may be added and some of the above mentioned stops may even be eliminated. If you are interested in watching a live Formula D event, you are advised to obtain an up-to-date schedule for the year or years which you would like to attend. Word Count 643

Hot new way to treat an old problem

While scientists suspect humans have been suffering from back pain since learning to walk upright, doctors today have discovered a simple but effective way to relieve it. The use of continuous low-level heat (36-40°C) therapy (CLHT) in a portable heat wrap significantly reduces acute low back pain and related disability of employees suffering from acute low back pain in the workplace, according to a Johns Hopkins School of Medicine study published in the December 2005 issue of The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. "With recent concerns around the safety of oral pain medications, both patients and physicians are considering alternative treatment options for acute low back pain," said Edward J. Bernacki, M. D., M. P.H., Associate Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the study's lead author. "There is substantial evidence to confirm that acute low back pain responds well to CLHT. The dramatic differences shown by workplace participants using CLHT shows that this therapy has clear benefits for low back pain and that it plays an important role in pain management." In the study, patients who visited an occupational injury clinic for low back pain either received education regarding back therapy and pain management alone or received the same education combined with three days of CLHT by wearing ThermaCare® HeatWraps for eight hours. The CLHT group experienced significant reduction in pain intensity and greater pain relief when compared to patients who only received pain education (reference group). Patients on CLHT showed a 107 percent pain intensity reduction and an 85 percent improvement in pain relief within one day of treatment as compared to the reference group. Low back pain is one of the most common and, therefore, costly medical problems in industrialized countries, according to Dr. Bernacki, who also directs the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine department of health, safety and the environment. Approximately half the working-age people in the United States suffer from acute low back pain every year and the estimated productivity loss comes to $20 to $50 billion annually. Now, doctors and employers can confidently recommend CLHT for the relief of acute low back pain to their patients and employees, respectively. Like any heat treatment, CLHT therapy may not be appropriate for everyone. Individuals who have disease conditions that can compromise skin circulation (e. g., diabetes, hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis) should consult their physicians or health care provider prior to using CLHT for low back pain.

New technology for chronic pain relief

When we experience pain in any part of our bodies, it is usually an indication that something is wrong. The intensity of pain can range from mild and occasional to severe and constant. A sudden and sharp pain is called acute pain. It may either be mild that lasts for a short while, or may be severe that lasts for weeks or even months. Acute pain usually disappears as soon as the underlying cause of pain is treated or healed.

However, when acute pain persists, it may lead to chronic pain. Even when an injury has healed, chronic pain continues to remain active for weeks, or months, even years. While some chronic pain may have been caused by an initial trauma or infection, some people may suffer chronic pain in the absence of any past injury or illness. For people suffering in pain problems, modern advances in medicine provide new methods for chronic pain relief. Over the years, chronic pain had been dismissed as something that is just “in the head”.

However, modern technology has developed ways to understand how the sensation of pain occurs. It has gained greater understanding of how the nervous system, including the spinal cord, interacts with the brain to create such sensation of pain. New insights into the brain's neurotransmitter system have paved the way for new techniques in chronic pain relief. Recently, scientists have discovered ways how to maneuver those chemical messengers to change the way they interact with the brain. This led to the use of antidepressants and other drugs as effective medication for chronic pain relief. Advances in MRI imaging have allowed researchers to clearly demonstrate how real the changes in the brain are. It exactly shows where the sensation of pain is occurring in the brain upon activation by a stimuli. The effects of pain on emotion can be seen, and vice versa.

According to Dr. Kwai-Tung Chan, a pain specialist and professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, there's a new understanding of a process called central sensitization. He said that if the initial pain from an injury is not adequately treated, those pain signals are sent repeatedly -- which leads to changes in the central nervous system, making it more and more sensitive. Over time, even the gentlest touch can become very painful. Pain specialists are banking on these new insights to prescribe new treatments that attack moderate-to-severe chronic pain from different angles: innovative drugs, targeted nerve-zapping procedures, and drug pumps that deliver strong painkillers to the nerve root. There is also a growing evidence that the use of psychotherapy, relaxation techniques and alternative methods can induce chronic pain relief through mind-body connection.

Research has done a great deal in developing new treatment options in pain management. And there are more advances in the offing. However, people should realize that there are medical doctors who specialize in pain management. Most often, patients consult medical experts when in the later stages of chronic pain when it is already quite difficult to treat. The earlier the condition is treated, the better chances for treatments to be effective.

Massage information for consumers

What should someone expect during a massage? - The massage therapist will ask questions about what prompted you to get a massage. - The massage therapist will want background information about your physical condition, medical history, lifestyle, stress levels and any painful areas. - The massage therapist will ask what your health goals are and will discuss how massage may help you achieve those goals. - During a one-on-one massage, you will be asked to remove clothing to your level of comfort.

Clothing is not removed during “chair” massages. Consumers also should consider the following tips to help them find a massage therapist who is trained and qualified. - Are you licensed to practice massage? (35 states have passed legislation to regulate massage therapy) - Are you a member of the American Massage Therapy Association? - Are you Nationally Certified in Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork? Massage May Help Ease Your Pain Millions of Americans are all too familiar with pain. There can be countless trips to the doctor or chiropractor, pain medications, sleepless nights and the burden of making it through the day while enduring pain. Have you tried massage? A recent survey by the American Hospital Association shows that nearly 82 percent of hospitals that use some form of complementary or alternative care use massage therapy, with 70 percent of those hospitals using massage for pain management and pain relief. A consumer survey commissioned by the American Massage Therapy Association? (AMTA) reveals that more people than ever are seeking massage to manage and relieve pain. The survey shows that nearly half, 47 percent, of those polled have had a massage specifically for pain relief. A 2003 survey of 1,998 massage clients showed that 63 percent believed massage therapy provided them greater pain relief than chiropractic, acupuncture, physical therapy or other bodywork. Clinical research has shown massage therapy can: - Be more effective for chronic back pain than other complementary therapies. - Promote relaxation and alleviate the perception of pain and anxiety in cancer patients. - Reduce post-traumatic headaches better than cold pack treatments. - Lessen pain and muscle spasms in patients who have undergone heart bypass surgery when part of hospital-based surgery treatment. - Stimulate the brain to produce endorphins. - Improve confidence by encouraging patients to effectively cope with their pain. If you have chronic pain, talk to your doctor about adding massage by a qualified massage therapist to your pain management program. Finding a trained and qualified massage therapist is important, so look for a member of AMTA.