Surgeon general uncertain about what hospital to check his grandmother into

The Surgeon General, after reading the results of a recent report about the alarming number of fatalities in U. S. hospitals that are due to preventable human error, was uncertain about what hospital to check his grandmother into when he learned that she was suffering from shortness of breath. He decided the time had come from decisive government action. As a result, all hospitals must now display at the registration desk the following warning: "The Surgeon General has determined that hospitals may be hazardous to your health and may result in accidental death." The American Civil Liberties Union is protesting the necessity of posting the warning, maintaining it infringes on the right of hospitals to conduct their business with the normal expectation that a certain number of patients will live and a certain number will leave in a less vital condition. A spokesman for the ACLU stated, "This is clearly an infringement of the right to free enterprise. Hospitals should be entirely free to inform patients they can expect excellent healthcare, even if the spokesperson is not certain the institution can provide it. Compelling hospitals to be forthright about the prospects for survival unnecessarily infringes on their right to misinform patients." Commenting on the issue, Chief Justice John Roberts said, "I can't comment because I could get appendicitis at any time, and I certainly wouldn't want the hospital to suspect I may not, should I survive the operation, act in its best interest." In an effort to bolster the government's case, the FDA plans to establish a task force composed of hospital inspectors who will impersonate patients. At the end of a one year trial, a determination will be made of how many are still alive. Further action will be based on the tally

Formula d racing series events and venues

Formula D Racing Series Events and Venues Formula D Racing, also commonly referred as a Formula Drifting, is a popular sport. That sport has recently started gaining popularity in the United States. In fact, a few years ago, a professional drifting series was created. This group of drivers and the series that they race in is sometimes referred to the Formula Drift Championship. In the Formula Drift Championship, around fifty drivers compete to be known as the best professional drifter in the United States. Like all other professional racing events, these events take place in a series of different locations, namely professional race tracks. When it comes to all racing events, including Formula D Racing, you will find that it is hard to examine all of the different racing venues. This is because they tend to change. As Formula D continues to rise in popularity, there is a good chance that additional tracks will be added, in the years to come. However, you if you interested in learning more about the tracks which have already hosted an event, you are advised to pick a season and research those specific venues. For this article, we will focus on the 2006 Formula Drifting season. Atlanta, Georgia is one of the stops on the Formula Drifting series. Their events take place on Road Atlanta. Road Atlanta is known as one of the best road courses in the United States. In fact, it is also known on a worldly level. In 2004, the staff at Road Atlanta added another horseshoe turn just for the Formula Drifting series. This new paved turn helps to add extra excitement to the events being hosted at Road Atlanta. In addition to Formula D Racing, Road Atlanta is also home to a number of other popular racing events. These events include, but are not limited to the AMA Suzuki Superbike Showdown, the Audi Driving Experience, and the Kevin Schwantz Suzuki School. The Formula Drift series also makes a stop in Sonoma, California. That stop is to the Infineon Raceway. The Infineon Raceway is popular due to its location. It is located near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco; in fact, it is located only thirty miles from there. In addition to the Formula Drift series, the Infineon Raceway is also home to a number of other popular racing events. These events include, but are not limited to, NASCAR, drag racing, and the AMA Superbike tour. Unlike the above mentioned tracks, Formula Drifting also takes place at Solider Field in Chicago, Illinois. If you are familiar with Soldier Field, the football stadium, you may be wondering how drifting can take place there. Despite what you may believe, the event does not actually take place inside the stadium; instead it takes place outside of it, in the parking lot. During the Formula Drift event, the lot is transformed into an amazing drifting course. Although it may not be on a track, the excitement is still the same, if not better. One of the reasons why this event is so popular is because, aside from New Jersey, Formula D Racing usually does not usually come up to the mid or upper north east area. In addition to the above mentioned venues, the Formula Drift series also makes stops in Long Beach and Irwindale, California, Seattle, Washington, and Wall, New Jersey. In Wall, New Jersey, the action takes place at the Air Force Reserve Wall Speedway. In Long Beach California, the action takes place in the Streets of Long Beach. In Irwindale, California, the events take place at the Irwindale Speedway. As you can see, a number of these events are hosted at well-known racetracks and others are hosted in other locations, such as city streets or parking lots. As previously mentioned, the above mentioned venues were on the 2006 Formula Drifting circuit. In the future, additional stops may be added and some of the above mentioned stops may even be eliminated. If you are interested in watching a live Formula D event, you are advised to obtain an up-to-date schedule for the year or years which you would like to attend. Word Count 643

Nursing uniforms

Are Nursing Uniforms Required - And Do Some Hospitals Provide Them for Nurses? Nursing Uniforms have been a hot ticket item as of late. With the recent surge within the nursing profession, uniform sales have also been on the rise. Nursing uniforms are a necessity for all nurses regardless of where they work, so you can imagine what kind of demand has been placed on these outfits in recent years. In addition to individuals buying nursing uniforms, hospitals are also buying these uniforms in bulk for many of their nurses. Not all hospitals take up this practice, but the ones that do order up to a hundred uniforms at once. Additionally, a nurse needs more than one nursing uniform. During the course of a day, nurses will get their uniforms dirty and soiled; sometimes to a point beyond repair.

At that time, it is always good to have a backup in place. Most nurses have a uniform for every day of the week that they work. In other words, if a nurse works four days a week, it might be a good idea to have four nursing uniforms. This way, you do not have to worry about getting your wash done on time, or running out of uniforms should something happen to the ones that you have. Again, some hospitals offer free nursing uniforms.

This may not sound like much, but it can be a plus if you are required to have a certain amount of uniforms. If a hospital offers this service, it is something that they will use as a selling point in there efforts to land new nurses. Nursing uniforms have always been required, and probably always will be. People need to be able to identify these workers, so having them in a standard uniform is the best way of doing so. As long as the demand for nurses continues to rise, the demand for nursing uniforms will also climb. This is good news for the companies that manufacture nursing uniforms.

Nursing uniforms

Are Nursing Uniforms Required - And Do Some Hospitals Provide Them for Nurses? Nursing Uniforms have been a hot ticket item as of late. With the recent surge within the nursing profession, uniform sales have also been on the rise. Nursing uniforms are a necessity for all nurses regardless of where they work, so you can imagine what kind of demand has been placed on these outfits in recent years. In addition to individuals buying nursing uniforms, hospitals are also buying these uniforms in bulk for many of their nurses. Not all hospitals take up this practice, but the ones that do order up to a hundred uniforms at once.

Additionally, a nurse needs more than one nursing uniform. During the course of a day, nurses will get their uniforms dirty and soiled; sometimes to a point beyond repair. At that time, it is always good to have a backup in place. Most nurses have a uniform for every day of the week that they work. In other words, if a nurse works four days a week, it might be a good idea to have four nursing uniforms. This way, you do not have to worry about getting your wash done on time, or running out of uniforms should something happen to the ones that you have. Again, some hospitals offer free nursing uniforms. This may not sound like much, but it can be a plus if you are required to have a certain amount of uniforms. If a hospital offers this service, it is something that they will use as a selling point in there efforts to land new nurses.

Nursing uniforms have always been required, and probably always will be. People need to be able to identify these workers, so having them in a standard uniform is the best way of doing so. As long as the demand for nurses continues to rise, the demand for nursing uniforms will also climb. This is good news for the companies that manufacture nursing uniforms.

The quality of hospital food

In this article I write about the quality, or lack of it, in the food that is served in some of the UK hospitals. My nan has recently died in hospital which has been very upsetting for my family. She was hit by one of the famous hospital bugs and became very weak. She was in need of some decent food which would have helped to build up her strength. What she received was basically so poor and tasteless that she found it hard to eat. Despite many attempts by various members of the family to pursuade her to eat more, she could not stomach it and kept saying that it the food had no taste and that it was disgusting. I have to admit that it was not exactly tempting when I saw what was being dished out. In the UK we are very lucky in the standard of our hospitals when you compare it to many other countries in the world. Our country is very rich but a lot of this cash is being wasted on certain projects. Surely people in our hospitals deserve a much higher standard of food, food which they can look forward to eat. I have recently watched a program about how Jamie Oliver is trying to improve the standard of food in schools throughout the UK. This is a very worthwhile project and as a father of two children myself, I am more than aware that the canteen food served in most schools is not up to scratch. At the schools where my own children attend, the parents have the option of paying for these meals or they can make their child a packed lunch. We choose the packed lunch option. In hospitals there is no such option. I would have loved to have been able to cook some food for my nan, which I could then have taken to her when I visited. I would have also liked to have taken some cleaning products as the place could have done with some tender loving care as well as a lick of paint. A message to Jamie Oliver, you are doing a sterling job but please could you turn your attention to the hospitals next! A message to Tony Blair, stop wasting money killing our troops in Iraq and start looking after your own! I am not trying to say that my nan would have survived if the standard of food had been better in the hospital where she spent her final days. What I am trying to say is that I hope it improves in a big way before I have to spend any time there.

Mrsa in ireland

In Ireland those who run the hospitals would rather you did not know how many people were being infected as a result of a hospital acquired infection. Incredibly, journalists have been forced to use freedom of information legislation to prise the information from the hospitals and even then the picture is incomplete with some hospitals “unable” to provide any figures at all and with no national figures available on the death rate from MRSA or other “superbug” type infections. The Health Service Executive has said it will now ask all Irish hospitals to publish data on the prevalence of the potentially fatal superbug MRSA on a regular basis The best estimates at the moment are that there are about 8000 patients per annum picking up an infection in hospital and of that number approximately 550 go on to acquire a more serious bloodstream infection. A recent survey by the Irish Patients Association revealed that in 2003, Ireland recorded the highest number of MRSA cases in Europe . In that year, Ireland recorded 119 cases per million. This is over twice the rate of the next worst country, Portugal , with 46 cases per million. Other European countries with a big MRSA problem include the UK , Greece and France . The Dutch have reduced their infection rate to almost zero and are seen as a model of how to tackle the problem. Ireland would seem to have been slower to recognise and react to the superbug threat than the UK and some of its other European neighbours but improved hygiene measures have been but in place and the new administration structure for the health service will see the different health boards operating in a much more co-ordinated manner than in the past and already there is a nationwide hygiene audit of all hospitals underway. As with the other nations battling this problem, now that the genie is out of the bottle it may not be so easy to put it back in. The chronic over use of antibiotics has dramatically reduced the arsenal available for the fight. The systematic and long term decline in hospital resources, particularly in the area of hygiene, coupled with overcrowding will make it a very difficult problem to solve in the short or even medium term.

Mrsa in ireland

In Ireland those who run the hospitals would rather you did not know how many people were being infected as a result of a hospital acquired infection. Incredibly, journalists have been forced to use freedom of information legislation to prise the information from the hospitals and even then the picture is incomplete with some hospitals “unable” to provide any figures at all and with no national figures available on the death rate from MRSA or other “superbug” type infections. The Health Service Executive has said it will now ask all Irish hospitals to publish data on the prevalence of the potentially fatal superbug MRSA on a regular basis The best estimates at the moment are that there are about 8000 patients per annum picking up an infection in hospital and of that number approximately 550 go on to acquire a more serious bloodstream infection. A recent survey by the Irish Patients Association revealed that in 2003, Ireland recorded the highest number of MRSA cases in Europe . In that year, Ireland recorded 119 cases per million. This is over twice the rate of the next worst country, Portugal , with 46 cases per million. Other European countries with a big MRSA problem include the UK , Greece and France . The Dutch have reduced their infection rate to almost zero and are seen as a model of how to tackle the problem. Ireland would seem to have been slower to recognise and react to the superbug threat than the UK and some of its other European neighbours but improved hygiene measures have been but in place and the new administration structure for the health service will see the different health boards operating in a much more co-ordinated manner than in the past and already there is a nationwide hygiene audit of all hospitals underway. As with the other nations battling this problem, now that the genie is out of the bottle it may not be so easy to put it back in. The chronic over use of antibiotics has dramatically reduced the arsenal available for the fight. The systematic and long term decline in hospital resources, particularly in the area of hygiene, coupled with overcrowding will make it a very difficult problem to solve in the short or even medium term.

Book offers tips for survival in hospitals

If you've watched a TV show with a hospital setting, you might have a notion - albeit exaggerated - of how the interactions between patients and doctors can create dramatic scenarios. A new book written by a doctor-nurse couple says similar dramas are playing out in real life. It warns of how we should be concerned about the lack of quality care that patients can receive in hospitals. "Hospital Battlefield: A Field Manual For Survival," written by Lynne and Joseph Golonka, explains that inside knowledge and a lot of questioning will go a long way toward improving health care in the U. S. While being critical of hospitals - to the point of receiving their fair share of backlash from the medical establishment - the Golonkas are quick to stress that the power to make change begins with the patient. "We want to stir up this closed-hospital system, not fight health care professionals," says Lynne, a registered nurse. The real enemy, she says, is illness. The book gives practical advice to help patients avoid hospital errors and infections and ensure a quick and safe recovery. The "going into battle" metaphor is not intended to pit patients against doctors and nurses in a war-like fashion, the authors explain. But it does convey the urgency of "survival" within an imperfect system. Chapters titled "Securing Allies" and "Chain of Command" are not difficult to equate with possible traps and troubles in hospitals. But the self-help guide is also peppered with medical-themed cartoons for a tongue-in-cheek approach to some of the challenges patients face along the way. Yet the issue itself is a serious one, and the authors say preparation must be made for potential hospitalization. Some questions and ideas raised include: * What are the right questions to ask medical professionals? Specifically, to whom do you address the questions and how do you ask them? * Why is it so important to demand accountability from hospitals? * What is one of the major reasons health insurance medical directors deny claims? Ultimately, the book presents a realistic view of hospital health care and cites a surprising 1999 study as the basis of its argument. As many as 98,000 die in hospitals each year as a result of serious medical errors, according to the Institute of Medicine. The Golonkas say that progress to improve the hospital system has been slow, and therefore they urge patients and families to be ready for battle.

See the world with travel jobs in radiology

The medical field is advancing quickly, and some hospitals are feeling the pull. With a shortage of technicians hitting many health care facilities, the need for those with a background in radiology is increasing. That's why the idea of traveling radiology jobs is becoming more popular. With fewer technicians onsite that know how to handle aspects of radiology care, hospitals are asking the techs to come to them. And the demand for these trained individuals is growing every day. If you're interested in a radiology job, chances are good you may be asked to travel. Many radiologists love the idea of going where they are most needed, and the chance to see the country while performing their jobs is a great benefit. While the idea of radiology jobs based on travel certainly isn't an ideal solution, it is a quick and efficient way to make sure everyone gets the care they need regardless of where they're located. So how does it work? Typically, a technologist who is willing to travel will be employed by an agency. The agency will put the tech in contact with various facilities, and the tech will sign a temporary contract with a hospital or clinic. The usual length of a contract with a radiologist on a travel basis is three months. The employee will be bussed or driven to the hospital location. All expenses for the tech are generally paid for by the hospital, and equipment is supplied on the premises. For a radiology job involving travel, the tech may have to adjust to several factors all working at once to create a constantly changing work environment. Often, hospitals will have varying procedures and different types of equipment, so there's little knowing what to expect until the tenure at the temporary location actually begins. Physicians and other technologists tend to have a great deal of respect for those with radiology travel jobs. The fact is that the traveling techs need to be more adaptive to their surroundings, and they need to know their job well enough to handle it under various - sometimes hectic - conditions. The traveling techs also have the advantage of being exposed to various ways of doing things, and may have access to more current methods and information than those techs employed at just one hospital. If you ask a hospital staff, they'll tell you that they will avoid using traveling radiology techs whenever possible, just because of the problems that can arise. If the tech is delayed, for example, patients might be forced to miss a crucial X-ray or treatment. It's a lot to gamble on. Eventually, most hospitals hope to hire their own in-house techs, and at that time the demand for those willing to do radiology travel jobs will probably decrease. In the meantime, however, there is a rising demand for this type of technician. If you're interested in a radiology travel job, now may be the best time to get involved. As a traveling radiology tech, you will receive full health insurance and benefits, and be considered a full-time employee by the agency that handles your dispatches. The agency will set up contacts with hospitals in the areas where you are willing to travel. Often the agency and various hospitals will have connections, so that the same techs may return to the same hospitals time and again. Over time, relationships develop between the travel techs and the clinics they visit, and both learn to count on each other to perform their jobs correctly. At this time, there are about 900 radiology travel job agencies in the United States.

In home health care services help loved ones with the issues they face

Most people are fortunate enough to live much of their lives with out worrying too much about how they will be cared for if they are unable to care for themselves – or, perhaps more importantly, how they would care for loved ones who need ongoing medical attention. In-home health care services are an option that helps to minimize hospital stays. While our hospitals are very capable of providing adequate treatment, there are a number of advantages to in home nursing care. Hospitals are busy places. Patients receive care, but, with an ever growing case load, hospital workers are stretched to make sure everyone has everything they need. Nursing care in the home is one-on-one, so all the patient’s needs are looked after. Hospitals need to be utilitarian.

That means hard floors, walls all the same neutral colours and medical equipment at the ready. This helps the hospital function better, but it can make patients uncomfortable. Home health care means patients are cared for in the comfort of their own home. Hospitals are not always the best place to recover. Long-term stays in a hospital can make recuperation take longer. In home care has the opposite effect, patients have familiar comfortable surroundings which helps them to recover much quicker. Patients with chronic conditions, or those needing palliative care, find the strength that comes from receiving health care in their home helps them to deal with the physical and emotional hardships that result from their condition.

In home care gives a patient a greater sense of dignity, independence and pride that can make it easier for them to deal with the issues they face. The advantages can be lost, however, if the wrong in home health care service is used. You need a home care professional who is a qualified home health care provider. They need to know about what ails the patient, its symptoms and the proper way to use any equipment that’s needed.

The home healthcare specialists at Qualicare are registered nurses who are specially trained in home nursing procedures. They know the healthcare system and can get the most benefit from it for you.

Nursing shortage equals great opportunities now

How would you like a job that no matter where you went, you were in demand? The pay is great. Bonuses are paid when you are hired. You do not have to work in the same place year after year. In fact, you can change the vocation landscape every quarter if you wish. What kind of job am I speaking of? Nursing.

There is such a nursing shortage, they can demand just that. Not just in the United States, but all over the world. It is estimated that there are over 120,000 nursing vacancies in America. And it isn’t getting better.

As the US population continues to get older, the nursing shortage is expected to reach 800,000 in the next decade. Nurses can name their price. Some are making as much as $60-70 per hour. Yes, these are the best of times …

and the worse of times for nurses. Good, because they can practically name the terms of their employment. Bad because they are being over worked and our health care is suffering as a result of it. It is only a matter of time that someone’s life is lost as a result of this. American hospitals are starting to look overseas to satisfy their need for nurses. As this is being written, legislation is being worked to allow these immigrants a path to citizenship as they work in our hospitals. Pulling nurses from overseas creates problems for those countries that are losing nurses. Good health care is as much a premium there as it is here. This is not the long term solution to the problem.

Our government throws money at everything. Even in nursing education they provide educational grants, loans, etc. The problem is they do not have enough professors to teach new nurses. In fact, there were almost 30,000 qualified nursing students last year that could not get educated. Is this the government’s responsibility to ante up even more money to educate new nurses?

That is not for me to answer, but it seems like some of these agencies and hospitals could do more to encourage and help nurses enter the workplace. After all, these same agencies are willing to pay upwards to $5,000 as a hiring bonus for qualified nurses. This may not seem to be a problem to you … until you find yourself needing qualified healthcare.

Surviving in the hospital available medical technology to help you survive

More than having a comfortable, temporary residence in the hospital, it is important that one not only survive but come out of the hospital, alive and whole. According to a study, medical errors in hospitals cause more deaths each year than vehicle accidents, cancer or even AIDS. A recent study reported that there are up to 100,000 deaths each year caused by medical mistakes. Hence, medical mistakes are reported as the eighth leading cause of death among Americans. The causes of medical mistakes are many and varied. They can arise from the physician, specialist, hospital administration, nursing staff, pharmacists, and many other places. The type of medical mistakes also varies.

These include misdiagnosis, medication errors, surgery errors, laboratory test errors, and administrative errors. With the onset of cosmetic surgery, there have been many cases where patients come out of the hospital worse than when they entered. Even so-called minor operations are not without risks anymore. According to ABC7, one patient was supposed to have a common surgery to fix a hernia. But because of a series of mistakes, he found himself in a situation that nearly cost him his life. The patient was supposed to have his blood vessel cauterized as part of the procedure. However, one of the interns failed to do so. They then punctured his spleen.

Then they had to get the blood out of the lung cavity. But by doing so, they caused the patient's lung to collapse instead. In an effort to reduce errors, some hospitals turned to technology. Instead of using the traditional recording of communication, hospitals nowadays utilize electronic record. Computers are also common sights in hospitals. Nearly everyone uses a computer.

Doctors have portable stations where new and old medical records can be accessed with just a click of the mouse. Aside from a system of electronic checks and balances, pharmacy mistakes are reduced with the presence of bar-codes in all drugs and paraphernalia. Armbands are also introduced. Nurses are now able to scan the patients' armband and match it with the electronic record, thus, reducing errors. Despite technology's assistance, it is still advised that patients should not rely solely on technology. Doctors recommend that the patients themselves should be responsible enough to check their own record and ask their physicians hard questions beforehand.

Knowing the extent of your illness, surgery and operation might just be the ticket to saving your own life.

Surviving in the hospital available medical technology to help you survive

More than having a comfortable, temporary residence in the hospital, it is important that one not only survive but come out of the hospital, alive and whole. According to a study, medical errors in hospitals cause more deaths each year than vehicle accidents, cancer or even AIDS. A recent study reported that there are up to 100,000 deaths each year caused by medical mistakes. Hence, medical mistakes are reported as the eighth leading cause of death among Americans. The causes of medical mistakes are many and varied. They can arise from the physician, specialist, hospital administration, nursing staff, pharmacists, and many other places. The type of medical mistakes also varies.

These include misdiagnosis, medication errors, surgery errors, laboratory test errors, and administrative errors. With the onset of cosmetic surgery, there have been many cases where patients come out of the hospital worse than when they entered. Even so-called minor operations are not without risks anymore. According to ABC7, one patient was supposed to have a common surgery to fix a hernia. But because of a series of mistakes, he found himself in a situation that nearly cost him his life. The patient was supposed to have his blood vessel cauterized as part of the procedure. However, one of the interns failed to do so. They then punctured his spleen. Then they had to get the blood out of the lung cavity.

But by doing so, they caused the patient's lung to collapse instead. In an effort to reduce errors, some hospitals turned to technology. Instead of using the traditional recording of communication, hospitals nowadays utilize electronic record. Computers are also common sights in hospitals. Nearly everyone uses a computer. Doctors have portable stations where new and old medical records can be accessed with just a click of the mouse. Aside from a system of electronic checks and balances, pharmacy mistakes are reduced with the presence of bar-codes in all drugs and paraphernalia.

Armbands are also introduced. Nurses are now able to scan the patients' armband and match it with the electronic record, thus, reducing errors. Despite technology's assistance, it is still advised that patients should not rely solely on technology. Doctors recommend that the patients themselves should be responsible enough to check their own record and ask their physicians hard questions beforehand. Knowing the extent of your illness, surgery and operation might just be the ticket to saving your own life.

Hospital peer review

In September, 2005, AllMed conducted research about the issues surrounding external hospital peer review. The purpose of this survey was to determine the problems which hospitals and medical groups are looking to solve when sending out cases for external review. The findings were quite interesting, as follows: · All of the survey respondents said they had sent a peer review out during the past six months. · Fifty percent of the respondents sent out one to five peer reviews, while 35 percent sent out more than five. Of these, eight percent sent out more than 20 in the past six months. The reasons respondents gave for sending out peer reviews included the following: · Eliminating conflicts of interest (93%) · Gaining access to specialist expertise (63%) · Improving quality or risk management (59%) · Improving patient safety (52%) · Preventing litigation (22%) · Meeting regulatory requirements (15%) · Overcoming staffing shortages (4%) According to one respondent, their hospital relies on external reviews because it is unable to perform internal reviews due to conflict of interests and limited subspecialty expertise. The respondents from smaller community hospitals commented that they lacked an adequate number of peers to conduct an internal review, especially in sensitive situations. What was more interesting is that 78 percent of the respondents said they would proactively consider sending out peer reviews to an external reviewer in the future. It’s clear from these results that independent review organizations like AllMed are playing an increasing role in helping hospitals improve the quality of care and, at the same time, reduce the risks associated with the review process. For information about AllMed’s hospital peer review services, please visit our website, or download our free hospital peer review white paper (http:// allmedmd. com/resources/downloads/wp_bppr. htm).

Hospital peer review

In September, 2005, AllMed conducted research about the issues surrounding external hospital peer review. The purpose of this survey was to determine the problems which hospitals and medical groups are looking to solve when sending out cases for external review. The findings were quite interesting, as follows: · All of the survey respondents said they had sent a peer review out during the past six months. · Fifty percent of the respondents sent out one to five peer reviews, while 35 percent sent out more than five. Of these, eight percent sent out more than 20 in the past six months. The reasons respondents gave for sending out peer reviews included the following: · Eliminating conflicts of interest (93%) · Gaining access to specialist expertise (63%) · Improving quality or risk management (59%) · Improving patient safety (52%) · Preventing litigation (22%) · Meeting regulatory requirements (15%) · Overcoming staffing shortages (4%) According to one respondent, their hospital relies on external reviews because it is unable to perform internal reviews due to conflict of interests and limited subspecialty expertise. The respondents from smaller community hospitals commented that they lacked an adequate number of peers to conduct an internal review, especially in sensitive situations. What was more interesting is that 78 percent of the respondents said they would proactively consider sending out peer reviews to an external reviewer in the future. It’s clear from these results that independent review organizations like AllMed are playing an increasing role in helping hospitals improve the quality of care and, at the same time, reduce the risks associated with the review process. For information about AllMed’s hospital peer review services, please visit our website, or download our free hospital peer review white paper (http:// allmedmd. com/resources/downloads/wp_bppr. htm).