Hire the best contractor in town with these tips

A Contractor is defined as a person who agrees to supply materials or perform services at a specified price, especially for construction work. If you have decided to hire a contractor for any kind of work in your house you should keep in mind certain precautions in mind. How do you find the right contractor for your self? There are many ways you could do this. Gets a prescreened contractor for your area from companies offering remodeling services?

Also, you could ask your friends and relatives to refer you a contractor we who have had a project done and were happy with the work done. Alternatively, search for a contractor in the local builder’s association etc. When the contractor you are hiring provides you with references, follow them up and ask the previous clients if they were happy with the work of the contractor and would they work again with him. It is also advisable that you should be explicit about what you to be done. While choosing the contractor, it is better to keep these tips in mind. For example e you would have a better choice if you have three different quotes. Don’t assume that the lowest quote may be the best quote, carefully compare the quotes, wait up for the right person and only hire that person with whom you feel you share a good rapport. Always insist on a written contract specifying the start and completion date of the project by the contractor. Additionally ensure that the contractor is insured, bonded and licensed.

Hire the best contractor in town with these tips

A Contractor is defined as a person who agrees to supply materials or perform services at a specified price, especially for construction work. If you have decided to hire a contractor for any kind of work in your house you should keep in mind certain precautions in mind. How do you find the right contractor for your self? There are many ways you could do this. Gets a prescreened contractor for your area from companies offering remodeling services? Also, you could ask your friends and relatives to refer you a contractor we who have had a project done and were happy with the work done. Alternatively, search for a contractor in the local builder’s association etc. When the contractor you are hiring provides you with references, follow them up and ask the previous clients if they were happy with the work of the contractor and would they work again with him. It is also advisable that you should be explicit about what you to be done. While choosing the contractor, it is better to keep these tips in mind. For example e you would have a better choice if you have three different quotes. Don’t assume that the lowest quote may be the best quote, carefully compare the quotes, wait up for the right person and only hire that person with whom you feel you share a good rapport. Always insist on a written contract specifying the start and completion date of the project by the contractor. Additionally ensure that the contractor is insured, bonded and licensed.

What you need to know before you hire a contractor

When you are building a new home or getting renovations done you are going to need a good contractor. Your contractor is the person who is in charge of the entire project and who will make sure that everything gets done on time and on budget. Without this very important and skilled worker you could find that things get way out of hand. You need to choose the right contractor for the job and in order to do that you need to know what you should be on the lookout for. The first thing that you need to do is talk to the contractor in order to see how they listen. Is this contractor good as listening or does he or she simply talk over you and try to push you to thinking their way? You want to work with someone that will do their best to get your vision working. This is your home and your home improvement project needs to be something that you can live with in the end. The next thing that you need to do is get some references. Get at least 5 references from each of the contractors that you are considering hiring. Then make the calls and see what these clients have to say. Ask specific questions as well as what they liked and did not like about the contractor. Some people don’t like saying bad things about people, so you may need to phrase things a little different. For example, ask what they would have changed about the contractor if they could have. This will usually get a pretty good response. These answers are going to help you to choose the contractor that is right for you’re and your home improvement project. Most homes could do with a little remodeling and renovations, the next time that you are considering selling your home think about whether it may not be a better idea to just hire a contractor and make your home more livable.

The art of hiring a contractor

I will be submitting articles on hiring contractors to problem solving typical to not so typical home repairs and improvements homeowners typically come across. If you have questions please feel free to submit to this article and I will try to answer your questions. However, for today I would like to discuss Home improvement contractors. In a prior life, I was a home improvement contractor for a number of years and have experienced situations from the other side as a contractor. There are things that a homeowner can look for when hiring a contractor. These things are obvious. First, notice punctuality, Secondly, look at the vehicle that the contractor arrives in. Is it in disrepair? Think about it a contractor that cares about his business would invest in a vehicle that shows he is serious about business. Now I am not saying he has to show up in a 50,000.00-dollar vehicle.

It should be presentable. Next, does he shake your hand when introducing himself? Ask questions, look for tell tale signs. References, a good contractor has a following. Is he licensed? Is he insured?

Taking time to notice these things should help in your decision in hiring a home improvement contractor. Only you the homeowner can avoid hiring a wannabe contractor. NEXT: Tales from the Home improvement contractors point of view.

How to choose a pool contractor

Choosing a contractor to build your pool isn't that much unlike choosing a contractor to work on any other part of your house. You need to be wary, do your research, and be armed with a few key pieces of advice. Below are some bits of that very advice you need before choosing your pool contractor. The first thing you want to do is get more than one quote. Three to five quotes are usually considered ideal. Going the extra mile on this step really is worth your time especially since any good contractor will provide a quote free of charge.

Make sure you read the fine print and do a comparison of all the bids. Use all the same materials and the same design when talking to the contractor so that when they write out the quote, you can later compare the same things. Different quotes don't do much good if they're all for different things. Make sure the contractor comes to visit your home so they can see the site where the pool is to be built. Ask the contractor for testimonials. There are fewer things that are as reassuring as hearing from others that the contractor is worth his salt. Ask others if they have ever heard of the contractors that you are considering.

When speaking to the past customers, ask how the service was and how problems were handled. Also ask about how much time it took for the pool to be built. While you want the contractor to take the time to do a good job, you don't want to start building a pool in April only to still have an empty hole in your backyard in December. You absolutely must make sure that they are licensed and insured. In most states (if not all) pool contractors must have a license. And it only makes good business sense to make sure that they are insured if any unforeseen problems arise. Also check with the Better Business Bureau to see how they rank there.

Should i hire an employee or a contractor

Are you confused about whether you should hire a contractor vs employee? If so, you're not alone. Knowing when it's time to hire a contractor instead of an employee is one of the most confusing aspects of employment for many businesses. Below we have provided some tips to help you sort through the confusion regarding independent contractor vs. employee hiring. One of the most critical aspects of understanding contractor vs. employee hire is in understanding each are classified. If you should incorrectly classify someone as either one or the other, you could held liable for employment taxes as well as a penalty by the IRS. The basic rule of thumb to remember when trying to determine whether someone is a contractor or not is by asking yourself whether you have the right to control or direct result of the work or the means and methods of accomplishing the result. If you only have the right to control the results of the work, then the individual is a contractor. However, if you have the right to control the means and methods by which the work is accomplished, then the person is an employee. If you keep the rule regarding what you have the right to control and direct in mind, it will help you to remember the difference between employee and contractor hire. Knowing when and how to hire a contractor; however, requires understanding the various advantages and disadvantages of each classification. One of the biggest myths regarding contractor vs. employee hire is that you won't be required to deal with reporting income on contractors. This is only partially true. You are still responsible for reporting wages that you pay to an independent contractor if you pay that person more than $600 per year. This information is reported on IRS Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income. When you make the decision to hire an independent contractor, it is always a good idea for both of you to sign an agreement putting forth the terms of your business relationship. This agreement should include the services which are to be performed, the timing regarding when the services are to be performed, specific information on the payment for the services, confidentiality, warranty and work for hire information. If you are not familiar with the terms work for hire or you aren't sure about what kind of confidentiality information you should include in an independent contractor agreement, take a look at these tips. Generally, most independent contractor agreements include information that states the contractor is not allowed to use any proprietary information they learn about your company during the course of working for you that could be used for any other purpose than the benefit of your business. It's very important that you include a work for hire statement in your agreement. This stipulates that the work or product which is developed will be liable to copyright laws and as such will be owned by your company; not the contractor.

Should i hire an employee or a contractor

Are you confused about whether you should hire a contractor vs employee? If so, you're not alone. Knowing when it's time to hire a contractor instead of an employee is one of the most confusing aspects of employment for many businesses. Below we have provided some tips to help you sort through the confusion regarding independent contractor vs. employee hiring. One of the most critical aspects of understanding contractor vs. employee hire is in understanding each are classified. If you should incorrectly classify someone as either one or the other, you could held liable for employment taxes as well as a penalty by the IRS. The basic rule of thumb to remember when trying to determine whether someone is a contractor or not is by asking yourself whether you have the right to control or direct result of the work or the means and methods of accomplishing the result. If you only have the right to control the results of the work, then the individual is a contractor. However, if you have the right to control the means and methods by which the work is accomplished, then the person is an employee. If you keep the rule regarding what you have the right to control and direct in mind, it will help you to remember the difference between employee and contractor hire. Knowing when and how to hire a contractor; however, requires understanding the various advantages and disadvantages of each classification. One of the biggest myths regarding contractor vs. employee hire is that you won't be required to deal with reporting income on contractors. This is only partially true. You are still responsible for reporting wages that you pay to an independent contractor if you pay that person more than $600 per year. This information is reported on IRS Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income. When you make the decision to hire an independent contractor, it is always a good idea for both of you to sign an agreement putting forth the terms of your business relationship. This agreement should include the services which are to be performed, the timing regarding when the services are to be performed, specific information on the payment for the services, confidentiality, warranty and work for hire information. If you are not familiar with the terms work for hire or you aren't sure about what kind of confidentiality information you should include in an independent contractor agreement, take a look at these tips. Generally, most independent contractor agreements include information that states the contractor is not allowed to use any proprietary information they learn about your company during the course of working for you that could be used for any other purpose than the benefit of your business. It's very important that you include a work for hire statement in your agreement. This stipulates that the work or product which is developed will be liable to copyright laws and as such will be owned by your company; not the contractor.

Home improvement guide choosing a good and affordable contractor

When making home improvements, some homeowners choose to handle the project themselves. However, individuals with little home improvement knowledge will have to rely on a contractor. Selecting a good and affordable contractor is essential. Because some contractors are shady and charge ridiculously high fees, picking the right contractor requires research. Here are a few tips to help you pick the best contractor for your next home improvement project.

Get Referrals from Family and Friends Asking family and friends for the name of a good contractor may prove worthwhile. If a relative or acquaintance completed similar home improvements, and were satisfied with the work, using the same contractor may speed up the selection process. Trying to identify a shady contractor is difficult. Using referrals to select a contractor will increase your chances of finding a reputable home improvement company. Browse Contractors Listed in the Yellow Pages If your friends and family cannot refer a good contractor, you will have to rely on the yellow pages and other forms of advertisements. The yellow pages include many listings, which makes the selection process challenging. Rule of thumb: do not hire the first contractor you contact. Instead, request information and quotes from several companies. Get an estimate and ask how long it will take to complete the job. Each company will quote you slight different estimates. It is tempting to choose the least expensive contractor. However, keep in mind that more expensive contractors may use better materials or has a reputation for good work. Research Contractors with the Better Business Bureau As you begin your search for a good contractor, contact the Better Business Bureau (BBB) in your local area. If a contractor or company has received any complaints from past customers or has developed a bad reputation, the BBB will have this information. While browsing contractors, choose one with a flawless record. Along with researching complaints by the BBB, request references from the contractor. Ideally, references should be current and include customers that had similar work completed on their homes. Contact previous customers to see if they were satisfied with the contractor's work.

Who s your next contractor

Finding the right contractor for your home improvement project Naturally the first advice is someone who has been recommended by a trusted source. Relatives, friends or neighbors are a good starting point. It is natural to assume that these referrals can be trusted however be sure to check how long ago the work was done. The reason for this is that over years there is turnover in a crew or the actual owner may have done the work if he had just started in the business. Lastly, it is always helpful to check a local contractor advertising directory for any clues. Outside your immediate circle there are many places you can find a contractor so don’t pick one source. Check the local pages, BBB, licensing databases in your state, contractors own references and finally like in most aspects of life the Internet offers information on local contractors in your area via niche sites. You can also check for websites offering local contractor syndication to deliver news straight to your desktop or RSS reader. Finally the FREE estimate, since it is FREE contact at least three or four contractors for estimates this will help you in making an educated decision. If it were a smaller project probably three would suffice. The initial meeting All meetings personal or business meeting rely on first impressions. Your instinct comes into play here if you don’t feel right about a contractor then probably he’s not the right choice for you. Allow at least for one hour per interview and ask as many questions as you can. When they leave, check if the contractor has participated in any contractor search marketing over the web in case the individual has any ratings or reviews. Questions you should come away with an answer after the initial meeting: Is the contractor or salesman presentable in appearance? Is he the owner, if not does he sell for many different contractors? Was he willing to discuss other jobs with you? Did you feel any pressure to buy or sign on the proverbial dotted line? A good contractor will deliver more information than you need and in most cases your husband or wife may not be present and you will have to explain the information to them.

Choosing a home construction or remodeling contractor

Choosing the right Contractor is the most important aspect of any home construction project. You must take your time and do your research to find a good qualified contractor if you want excellent quality at a fair price. When we built our new home we spent many hours finding the best contractors for each aspect of building our new home. We developed a method that served us well and it is as follows: Determine exactly what you want done and write it down. This may sound a little basic at first blush, but it is so important. Remember what is not well defined is easily manipulated. If it is not in writing, it can be disputed. You do two things when you define your project in detail, and in writing. You find any missing aspects that you may have overlooked and you have good definition and expectations for your contractor. Get three (3) bids for each trade that you will hire. Never rely on one bid, and always meet the contractor face to face at the site where the work is to be done. If you are uncomfortable with the contractor when they are bidding the job how is it going to be when the two of you have to work out the details of your project. Remember cheaper is not always better! Ask each contractor for references and make sure they are bonded and insured. Check their references and call the BBB (Better Business Bureau) in your area to see if they have any outstanding complaints. Make sure they don’t sub the work out to a contractor that is not insured or bonded. It is very common for a contract company to sub out work to contractors that are not insured and bonded. Another danger of the contractor subbing work out is if they don’t pay their sub, the sub can put a mechanics lien on your house and you will have to pay even if you have already paid the contractor. Set a definite timeframe for the work to begin and for completion and get it in writing. Nothing is worse than to have a project drag on not knowing when they are going to show up and finish. Never, ever pay for the entire project in advance. If you do the contractor has no incentive to finish or even start. When you no longer have the money you are no longer in control! It is customary with most contractors that you pay a portion up front. On a large project hold back as much money as you can until the end. The incentive to finish must be motivated by the cash at the end of the project. For more information on finding and qualifying contractors visit Build-YourOwn-Home. com" target=new>http:// Build-YourOwn-Home. com"> Build-YourOwn-Home. com

Catching crooked contractors

Few times in the life of a homeowner can be more challenging than when significant repairs are needed. The number of issues, options and decisions seems endless, the most daunting of which is contractor selection. When choosing a contractor for a repair or renovation the most fundamental of screening techniques is the assurance that the contractor is properly licensed. The tales of tragedy brought about by the illegal actions of unlicensed contactors are enough to scare us into never making repairs! Thankfully, it is free and easy to eliminate these thieves from our lives if we do some simple research. The State of Florida requires that all contractors be properly licensed under the auspices of The Construction Industry Licensing Board. Each licensed contractor or company qualified to conduct business in the state has a license number.

The license number makes it easy to know what a particular contractor or company is licensed to do, but only if we know the code! Fortunately the code is easy to break. Nearly every license issued by the State of Florida is a combination of three letters and six numbers. The letters identify the type of work the contractor is licensed to perform and the numbers specify the individual contractor or company. At the top of the list are: CGC Certified General Contractor (Builders of big buildings) CBC Certified Building Contractor (Builders of small offices and stores) CRC Certified Residential Contractor (Builders of homes) It's starting to get simple! The licenses begin and end in the letter "C". A builder can build any building in or below the license level, so a General Contractor could build a home, but a Residential Contractor could not build a bank! Every system in a home or building is also required to be installed or repaired by properly licensed people. The simple secret code on this is: CCC Certified Roofing Contractor CAC Certified Mechanical Contractor (Heating and Air) CPC Certified Pool Contractor CFC Certified Plumbing Contractor EC Electrical Contractor To help us even more in avoiding unlicensed contractors the state requires that a contractor display their license number on every vehicle, invoice, bid, business card and solicitation. So, you can tell if a person is licensed before you even speak to them! Most people assume that the risk posed by unlicensed work is limited to poor quality or unfinished work. But it gets much worse! The homeowner who hires unlicensed contractors is responsible for all unpaid bills, fines, and worst of all, payment for any injury to the unlicensed contractor! It is illegal and ill-advised to hire these scoundrels! A quick link to all this and more, including everything you ever wanted to know about permitting - but were afraid to ask - is at gohomepro. com. Forewarned is forearmed, so check it out and keep the risks of unlicensed and illegal work away from your home!

Bonding companies contractor criteria

Bonding companies look at far more than just owners’ personal credit when it comes to contract surety over $100,000. A surety wants to have confidence in their bonded contractors prior to approval. There are numerous different actions a contractor can take to instill confidence in a bonding company. A contractor must be organized and practice restraint when necessary to gain the trust of an underwriter. For most, the best way to run a company in an organized fashion is to hire professionals they can count on to assist in decision making. A bond producer well versed in contract bonding should be a top priority.

If your agent is not knowledgeable enough or does not have the markets to fit your company’s needs, then there is little other professionals can do to help with your bonding needs. An accountant that understands construction is a must. The business financial statements are the highest weighted item for underwriting a contractor. You can think of them as the underwriter’s window into your company. A contractor must walk away if their accountant does not know how to complete financial statements on a percentage of completion basis. A good relationship with a banker is a rather obvious need for any business that relies heavily on loans to operate. There are numerous other professionals that one could utilize such as good a good controller and legal counsel, but we will stop our list here so it still applies to most contractors. Surety underwriters will want to periodically meet with their medium to larger sized contractors. The underwriter will want to see that the contractor knows their cash flow and their receivables that are over 90 days.

The underwriter will also want to see that the contractor can answer all other questions regarding their company. In other words, the underwriter will want to leave feeling confident that the contractor knows their industry and the specifics on their company. Earlier, I mentioned that a contractor must practice restraint when necessary. By restraint, I mean that they can not be blinded by profits and take risks above and beyond their ordinary work. A surety will not be comfortable approving a bond twice the size of any previously bonded work for a new company. A red flag is raised for any contractor that wants to do work outside of their niche and or territory. If an underwriter is not comfortable with the contract for any reason, they will decline the contractor.

A contractor must keep in mind that they are essentially obtaining surety credit. Underwriters must use the financial documentation provided and personal relationships to decide the risk on a particular account. A contractor that is well organized with a team of professionals to assisting them will create a great deal of confidence in a surety’s underwriters.

Bonding companies contractor criteria

Bonding companies look at far more than just owners’ personal credit when it comes to contract surety over $100,000. A surety wants to have confidence in their bonded contractors prior to approval. There are numerous different actions a contractor can take to instill confidence in a bonding company. A contractor must be organized and practice restraint when necessary to gain the trust of an underwriter. For most, the best way to run a company in an organized fashion is to hire professionals they can count on to assist in decision making. A bond producer well versed in contract bonding should be a top priority. If your agent is not knowledgeable enough or does not have the markets to fit your company’s needs, then there is little other professionals can do to help with your bonding needs.

An accountant that understands construction is a must. The business financial statements are the highest weighted item for underwriting a contractor. You can think of them as the underwriter’s window into your company. A contractor must walk away if their accountant does not know how to complete financial statements on a percentage of completion basis. A good relationship with a banker is a rather obvious need for any business that relies heavily on loans to operate. There are numerous other professionals that one could utilize such as good a good controller and legal counsel, but we will stop our list here so it still applies to most contractors. Surety underwriters will want to periodically meet with their medium to larger sized contractors. The underwriter will want to see that the contractor knows their cash flow and their receivables that are over 90 days.

The underwriter will also want to see that the contractor can answer all other questions regarding their company. In other words, the underwriter will want to leave feeling confident that the contractor knows their industry and the specifics on their company. Earlier, I mentioned that a contractor must practice restraint when necessary. By restraint, I mean that they can not be blinded by profits and take risks above and beyond their ordinary work. A surety will not be comfortable approving a bond twice the size of any previously bonded work for a new company. A red flag is raised for any contractor that wants to do work outside of their niche and or territory. If an underwriter is not comfortable with the contract for any reason, they will decline the contractor.

A contractor must keep in mind that they are essentially obtaining surety credit. Underwriters must use the financial documentation provided and personal relationships to decide the risk on a particular account. A contractor that is well organized with a team of professionals to assisting them will create a great deal of confidence in a surety’s underwriters.

Choosing the right contractor

If you own a home and have a project your thinking of, you may need a contractor, BUT you run a risk of being scammed by a fraudulent one. Contractor fraud in the home improvement industry is one of the most complained about industries at the Better Business Bureau. If you think fraud victims are just little old ladies, think again. Some unscrupulous contractors can be so clever that it makes them a hazard to all of us. Be carefull of the so-called "free" inspection or "my crew is in the neighborhood on another job". They seem to have extra materials left over and want to offer you a great discounted price, so they offer a free inspection and guess what? You need work done! The chances are the materials aren't the best, the workmanship is going to be shabby and the price he gives you will be so good you won't be able to pass it up. Oh and I almost forgot, you probably don't need any work done at all! Things To Look For When Hiring A Contractor: Check the contractor for a license and insurance Get references of his previous jobs Check with The Better Business Bureau for any complaints against his company Get at least 3 estimates from other contractors The good guys The vast majority of home contractors are honest, reputable small-business owners who work hard to make sure that they do high quality work, use good materials. They are dedicated to your satisfaction and earnestly want to earn your recommendation. Many contractors are members of professional organizations or unions that actively work to weed out contractor scams and fraud. By doing your part to protect yourself, you can prevent getting taken by clever, manipulative contractors.

Hiring the right contractor

If you own a home and have a project your thinking of, you may need a contractor, BUT you run a risk of being scammed by a fraudulent one. Contractor fraud in the home improvement industry is one of the most complained about industries at the Better Business Bureau. If you think fraud victims are just little old ladies, think again. Some unscrupulous contractors can be so clever that it makes them a hazard to all of us. Be careful of the so-called "free" inspection or "my crew is in the neighborhood on another job". They seem to have extra materials left over and want to offer you a great discounted price, so they offer a free inspection and guess what? You need work done! The chances are the materials aren't the best, the workmanship is going to be shabby and the price he gives you will be so good you won't be able to pass it up. Oh and I almost forgot, you probably don't need any work done at all! Things To Look For When Hiring A Contractor: Check the contractor for a license and insurance Get references of his previous jobs Check with The Better Business Bureau for any complaints against his company Get at least 3 estimates from other contractors The good guys The vast majority of home contractors are honest, reputable small-business owners who work hard to make sure that they do high quality work, use good materials. They are dedicated to your satisfaction and earnestly want to earn your recommendation. Many contractors are members of professional organizations or unions that actively work to weed out contractor scams and fraud. By doing your part to protect yourself, you can prevent getting taken by clever, manipulative contractors.