Middle school bullying 9 universal points for catching bullies

1. Distraction is the key to a middle school bully’s success! 2. Playing one staff member against another and creating confusion keeps bullying alive in middle schools. 3. Administrators, guidance counselors, and teachers desperately need to develop a system of communication about what these middle school bullies are doing on a daily basis. 4. If your bullies are on a checklist to monitor their bullying behavior, that information needs to be distributed to all of the staff involved in working with that bully. 5. One staff member should be responsible for distributing and collecting these behavior checklists and getting the information out to all staff involved. 6. Then these checklists or a summary of significant events in that middle school bully’s day needs to be communicated to staff members. 7. Most schools have a central computer system – communication about the bullies can be typed into the computer in a location all staff can access. 8. Communication among staff members about the bullying behavior is key to stopping the bullying of innocent students. Most bullies continue because they don’t think the adults are able to catch them. 9. Set up a communication system that is easy for staff to input information as well as access the information as needed and you will stop the bullying in your middle school.

Middle school bullying 9 universal points for catching bullies

1. Distraction is the key to a middle school bully’s success! 2. Playing one staff member against another and creating confusion keeps bullying alive in middle schools. 3. Administrators, guidance counselors, and teachers desperately need to develop a system of communication about what these middle school bullies are doing on a daily basis. 4. If your bullies are on a checklist to monitor their bullying behavior, that information needs to be distributed to all of the staff involved in working with that bully. 5. One staff member should be responsible for distributing and collecting these behavior checklists and getting the information out to all staff involved. 6. Then these checklists or a summary of significant events in that middle school bully’s day needs to be communicated to staff members. 7. Most schools have a central computer system – communication about the bullies can be typed into the computer in a location all staff can access. 8. Communication among staff members about the bullying behavior is key to stopping the bullying of innocent students. Most bullies continue because they don’t think the adults are able to catch them. 9. Set up a communication system that is easy for staff to input information as well as access the information as needed and you will stop the bullying in your middle school.

no bully policy at philadelphia schools

Philadelphia Schools has a “just say no” policy, when it comes to school bullies and other related negative student behavior. Approximately, two thirds of all deaths among children and adolescents in the United States are the result of injury-related causes. These include motor vehicle crashes, unintentional injuries, homicide and suicide. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 126 students committed a school-associated homicide or suicide between 1994 and 1999. Of these students, 28 committed suicide, of which eight intentionally injured others immediately before killing themselves.

None of these students were involved in gangs. The suicides, now referred to as “bullycide”, were attributed to school-associated violence, including bullying and other such social stressors. Though the 126 students may seem small for a national statistic, this is only the tip of the iceberg. It does not address the number of students who develop substance abuse and psychological problems due to being bullied and harassed at school — some for many years from elementary through high school by the same individual(s). “Pediatrics”, Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, reported in its May 5, 2004, issue that the rise of obesity and overweight in school-aged children is associated with “many negative social and psychological ramifications.” Peer aggression is at the top of the list. To work toward eliminating this rising national problem in their schools, Philadelphia schools developed a policy that prohibits anyone from bullying or seriously threatening any member of the school community during school hours and coming to and from school. This includes: • Repeated threats; • Threats of bodily injury; • Physical or psychological intimidation; • Extortion of any type; • Fighting or other acts/threats of violence; • Repeatedly posting information about another individual without his/her consent on the Internet, bulletin boards, school walls, individual’s personal belongings, or any other location — whether it is during school hours or not; and • Harassment for any reason, but especially due to race, gender, disability, language or physical characteristic. Besides school personnel, Philadelphia schools have enlisted the help of the students and their parents. They have set up a Bully Hotline that is staffed 24 hours a day for students or parents to report school-related abuse. The hotline serves over 175 languages through a telephonic interpretation service. Philadelphia schools promise to act on a reported problem within 24 hours of receiving the hotline complaint. For some issues, callers may receive a follow-up telephone call to ensure the situations were satisfactorily resolved. Philadelphia schools created flyers in nine different languages that describe the school policy against these negative behaviors, the Bully Hotline, and instructions for non-English language individuals to access the hotline. The eight non-English languages are the most frequently encountered in Philadelphia schools and represent over 85 percent of their “English as a Second Language” students. The flyers were sent to the parents of students enrolled in their schools. Additionally, they asked parents and community groups to further distribute the flyers throughout the city. Philadelphia schools are truly concerned about the safety and well-being of its students. They believe that all students have a right not to be bullied or harassed. With their “no bully” policy and the hotline, they are well on their way to prevent, address and eliminate intimidation and harassment of any student for any reason. This information on Philadelphia schools is brought to you by schoolsk-12.com.

Helping kids deal with bullying

It is not very uncommon to see withdrawn and shy kids in schools. These kids are aloof and somewhat indifferent to other children. Most likely, these kids seem unhappy because they are being bullied at school. Being bullied can be a total nightmare for any child. Although bullying can also be experienced by adults, this kind of social act frequently happens among kids or adolescents. Define bullying Bullying is different from an innocent teasing of a classmate, friend, or a sibling. Mere teasing is not harmful when done in a humorous or in an unintentional way. However, when teasing becomes extreme to the point that it is hurtful and turns into a habit on the part of the teaser, this act is then considered bullying. Generally, bullying is the purposeful or intentional act of an individual to verbally, physically, or psychologically torment another person. This act may be in the form of threatening, mocking, hitting, name-calling, and even soliciting money from the poor victim. Reasons why kids bully There are a number of reasons why kids bully their classmates or siblings. One of the major reasons for bullying others is the desire to feel superior among peers. School bullies often want to show others that they are important or in control of their clique. Usually, the victims of bullying are kids who do not have popular friends as well as those who appear timid or emotionally weak. Another typical reason why some kids bully other children at school is that they want to let others feel how is it like to be bullied or ridiculed. Studies show that bullies are oftentimes victims of bullying as well. Hence, they pick on others as means of getting even. Dealing with the school bullies Since bullying is inevitable to school environment, kids should know the ways or strategies in dealing with mean school bullies. Below are some of the important things that kids should know in handling or approaching bullying situations: 1. Tell your parents Telling adults about the situation will most likely stop the bullying. Once parents know about it, they can talk to the school principal or the teacher to arrange a meeting with the kid bully’s parents. 2. Literally avoid or ignore the bully Do not go to places where the school bully typically hangs around. It is always best not to be alone while at school. Be with close friends or classmates. Some bullies prefer to attack when their victims are alone. Thus, make sure to use the buddy system. 3. Simply walk away Be strong and courageous enough to say no to the attacks and demands of a school bully. When a bully says hurtful remarks, act like you don’t hear anything and just walk away. At some instances, the bullying eventually stops when the attacks are ignored by the bully’s target. 4. Be open about it Do not be afraid to talk about the bullying situation with someone you can trust other than your parents. These people may be the guidance counselor, a therapist, or your best friend. Remember that bullying can result to a number of grave side effects, thus, affecting the mental health of a child.

Middle school bullying get the facts and stop the bullying

Get the facts and stop your middle school hardcore bullies! Documentation is the key to stopping middle school bullying! The more data you have, the more successful you will be. For hardcore bullies, I enlist the help of the team of teachers that has that student currently. I attend one of their team meetings and ask them to document any bullying they see or hear from this particular bully. One teacher, who did not have this particular bully, heard him telling a girl in the hallway that she was fat. She walked out in the hall and asked him to stop. She then reported the incident to her team. At that meeting, I asked the 8th grade teachers to write down any bullying incidents they observe or intervene in and give them to me. When submitting these facts, I submit facts I have from past years on this student. In my opinion, bullies do not start the school year with a clean slate unless they have changed. These incidents from a variety of adults are complied on index cards. When I have enough documentation, I present the cards to the administration to take the appropriate action. Then, we start all over again. Why? Because it takes more than one time to stop a hardcore bully. In our school if the bully does not stop after several office referrals, they are removed from the general student population. So, get the facts! And stop your hardcore middle school bullies!

Middle school bullying get the facts and stop the bullying

Get the facts and stop your middle school hardcore bullies! Documentation is the key to stopping middle school bullying! The more data you have, the more successful you will be. For hardcore bullies, I enlist the help of the team of teachers that has that student currently. I attend one of their team meetings and ask them to document any bullying they see or hear from this particular bully. One teacher, who did not have this particular bully, heard him telling a girl in the hallway that she was fat. She walked out in the hall and asked him to stop. She then reported the incident to her team. At that meeting, I asked the 8th grade teachers to write down any bullying incidents they observe or intervene in and give them to me. When submitting these facts, I submit facts I have from past years on this student. In my opinion, bullies do not start the school year with a clean slate unless they have changed. These incidents from a variety of adults are complied on index cards. When I have enough documentation, I present the cards to the administration to take the appropriate action. Then, we start all over again. Why? Because it takes more than one time to stop a hardcore bully. In our school if the bully does not stop after several office referrals, they are removed from the general student population. So, get the facts! And stop your hardcore middle school bullies!

How to deal with cyber bullying

There have always been bullies, but the Internet has opened a whole new realm – cyber-bullying. Cyber-bullies are children who verbally harass other children online. While this is not officially considered an online crime, it can be detrimental to your child’s self esteem. Cyber-bullying can include cursing your child, spreading rumors about them and posing as your child in chat rooms. Sometimes a child may know exactly who their harasser is, but some cyber-bullies hide behind aliases while threatening online children. This might not seem as large a concern as adults who send pornography online to children, but People magazine recently published an article on several children who had been cyber-bullied and ended up taking their own lives because of it. Parents need to talk openly to their children about online protection against cyber-bullies. First and foremost, encourage your children to talk with you about any problems they may have with online harassment. Encourage them to confide in you or another trusted adult, such as a teacher, if they are being cyber-bullied. The Internet often gives users the illusion of anonymity and therefore, many think they write and say whatever they want without much thought. Teach your child how to block the email addresses in an attempt to stop abusive emails. Because it is easy to get additional email addresses, you may need to block additional addresses obtained by the cyber-bully. Instruct your children to save any messages that are mean or intimidating. Remind your child that cyber-bullying is just like regular bullying. They are doing it to get a reaction out of them. If you can convince your child to ignore the bully’s emails and comments, chances are the bully will get bored and give up. Point out to your child that real online friends won’t believe lies the cyber-bully may be spreading. Finally, if the person bullying your child online goes to his or her school, for your child’s safety, you may need to seek the advice of a teacher or principal. Online activity like this can lead to a diminished self esteem, cause learning problems and prolonged exposure to abuse and demeaning treatment.

How to deal with cyber bullying

There have always been bullies, but the Internet has opened a whole new realm – cyber-bullying. Cyber-bullies are children who verbally harass other children online. While this is not officially considered an online crime, it can be detrimental to your child’s self esteem. Cyber-bullying can include cursing your child, spreading rumors about them and posing as your child in chat rooms. Sometimes a child may know exactly who their harasser is, but some cyber-bullies hide behind aliases while threatening online children.

This might not seem as large a concern as adults who send pornography online to children, but People magazine recently published an article on several children who had been cyber-bullied and ended up taking their own lives because of it. Parents need to talk openly to their children about online protection against cyber-bullies. First and foremost, encourage your children to talk with you about any problems they may have with online harassment. Encourage them to confide in you or another trusted adult, such as a teacher, if they are being cyber-bullied. The Internet often gives users the illusion of anonymity and therefore, many think they write and say whatever they want without much thought. Teach your child how to block the email addresses in an attempt to stop abusive emails. Because it is easy to get additional email addresses, you may need to block additional addresses obtained by the cyber-bully. Instruct your children to save any messages that are mean or intimidating. Remind your child that cyber-bullying is just like regular bullying. They are doing it to get a reaction out of them. If you can convince your child to ignore the bully’s emails and comments, chances are the bully will get bored and give up. Point out to your child that real online friends won’t believe lies the cyber-bully may be spreading. Finally, if the person bullying your child online goes to his or her school, for your child’s safety, you may need to seek the advice of a teacher or principal. Online activity like this can lead to a diminished self esteem, cause learning problems and prolonged exposure to abuse and demeaning treatment.

Bullying and its effects

There was a recent incident in a school in Nova Scotia, Canada that called the public’s attention. This incident involved two high school seniors who arranged for them and dozens of their classmates to wear pink shirts to show support for another student who got bullied for wearing pink. Their actions have certainly brought light to the problems of a lot of students worldwide – bullying. Bullying Bullying is a form of harassment perpetrated by an abuser of more physical and/or social power and dominance than the victim. Bullying is done with clear intentions of causing harm to the target through verbal harassment, physical assault, emotional blackmail, or other more subtle methods of coercion such as manipulation. Bullying exists in any setting where social interaction is present. This includes schools, workplaces, inside the home, and around the neighbourhood. This may even between different social groups, social classes and even between countries. Like any kind of abusive behavior, bullying is a repetitive act done to gain power or control over another person. Generally, bullying is classified into 2 types: · Direct bullying. This includes physical aggression in the form of shoving and poking, throwing things, slapping, choking, punching and kicking, and beating. · Indirect bullying. This is also called social aggression. This forces victims to go into social isolation. This is usually done by spreading gossip about the victim, refusing to socialize with the victim, name calling, mocking the victim, forcing other people to not socialize with the victim as well, and manipulation. Why do bullies act the way they do? Some studies have shown that some bullies do it to be thought of as popular or tough, or to get attention. Bullies may also do it out of jealousy or may simply be acting out because they themselves were bullied. Some bullies are noted to have come from abusive families and neighbourhoods. After-effects of bullying Constantly being submitted to bullying may cause a person to develop inferiority complex. Inferiority complex, as the terminology implies, is a feeling of being inferior to others in one way or another. Always being mocked or negatively criticized by bullies may force a person to start believing the lies and second-guess themselves. Victims may also be more prone to developing stress related mental conditions such as anxiety and depression from frequently being bullied. How does one cope with bullying? Victims should always keep in mind that they’re not the problem, the bullies are. Victims should not start second-guessing themselves just because of the comments being thrown at them by bullies. Everybody has a right to safety and security. If you’re different in any way, don’t be ashamed of it and stand strong. It’s not your fault you’re unique. Always go out in a group with your friends, bullies won’t be able to single you out if you’re in a group. There’s always power in numbers. You can always just ignore the bully, tell them to stop pestering you, and walk away. If these tips don’t work, tell someone you trust. Thinking back on how the two senior students had acted upon seeing a co-student get bullied, it’s refreshing to know that even in the age where violence prevails, there are still people willing to help and stand up for what’s right. Bullying has been a long-time concern for schools and parents now, and its nice to hear of people taking a stand for those who are being bullied.

Middle school bullying stopped if you just keep trying

So, one of your stop bullying techniques has only made a dent in making the hardcore bully stop. Well, try another. 1. Your first school bully stopping technique was to talk to the bully, and he/she stopped briefly. Continue this technique as long as the victim keeps reporting the bullying. 2. But, just to be sure, add parent contact to your bag of tricks with this school bully. Once you have enough reports, some of which should be from teachers, contact the parent and get them involved in putting a stop to the bullying. 3. Thirdly, with one particular bully, once we got the parent involved, she signed him up for our in-school counseling program run by out County Health Department. 4. He was doing better but was still a little rough around the edges in terms of bothering others, so we assigned him a mentor from Bully Zapper Mentor program. 5. He was also receiving special education services and small group instruction and was closely monitored by several teachers and educational assistants – this helped our bully victims as well. 6. Class meeting on bullying and teasing were also presented to this student as well as all our middle school students in social studies classes once a quarter. 7. Finally, several of his bully victims filled out peer mediation forms, so he participated in coming up with solutions to stop bullying in these small group sessions. By eighth grade, he had a fairly good year with decent grades and minimal interventions. With most bullies one technique will not do the trick. Paula McCoach invites you to subscribe to the Bully Zapper Newsletter, which is published weekly with tons of tips on how to effectively deal with bullies in elementary and middle school. You will receive a free special report for your subscription. To subscribe, go to http:// bullyzapper. com ©2005 Permission granted to reprint this article in print or on your web site so long as the paragraph above is included and contact information is provided to the email coach@bullyzapper. com and http:// bullyzapper. com

Middle school bullying stopped if you just keep trying

So, one of your stop bullying techniques has only made a dent in making the hardcore bully stop. Well, try another. 1. Your first school bully stopping technique was to talk to the bully, and he/she stopped briefly. Continue this technique as long as the victim keeps reporting the bullying. 2. But, just to be sure, add parent contact to your bag of tricks with this school bully. Once you have enough reports, some of which should be from teachers, contact the parent and get them involved in putting a stop to the bullying. 3. Thirdly, with one particular bully, once we got the parent involved, she signed him up for our in-school counseling program run by out County Health Department. 4. He was doing better but was still a little rough around the edges in terms of bothering others, so we assigned him a mentor from Bully Zapper Mentor program. 5. He was also receiving special education services and small group instruction and was closely monitored by several teachers and educational assistants – this helped our bully victims as well. 6. Class meeting on bullying and teasing were also presented to this student as well as all our middle school students in social studies classes once a quarter. 7. Finally, several of his bully victims filled out peer mediation forms, so he participated in coming up with solutions to stop bullying in these small group sessions. By eighth grade, he had a fairly good year with decent grades and minimal interventions. With most bullies one technique will not do the trick. Paula McCoach invites you to subscribe to the Bully Zapper Newsletter, which is published weekly with tons of tips on how to effectively deal with bullies in elementary and middle school. You will receive a free special report for your subscription. To subscribe, go to http:// bullyzapper. com ©2005 Permission granted to reprint this article in print or on your web site so long as the paragraph above is included and contact information is provided to the email coach@bullyzapper. com and http:// bullyzapper. com

Middle school bullying get the facts and stop the bullies

Get the facts and stop your middle school hardcore bullies! Documentation is the key to stopping middle school bullying! The more data you have, the more successful you will be. For hardcore bullies, I enlist the help of the team of teachers that has that student currently. I attend one of their team meetings and ask them to document any bullying they see or hear from this particular bully. One teacher, who did not have this particular bully, heard him telling a girl in the hallway that she was fat. She walked out in the hall and asked him to stop. She then reported the incident to her team. At that meeting, I asked the 8th grade teachers to write down any bullying incidents they observe or intervene in and give them to me. When submitting these facts, I submit facts I have from past years on this student. In my opinion, bullies do not start the school year with a clean slate unless they have changed. These incidents from a variety of adults are complied on index cards. When I have enough documentation, I present the cards to the administration to take the appropriate action. Then, we start all over again. Why? Because it takes more than one time to stop a hardcore bully. In our school if the bully does not stop after several office referrals, they are removed from the general student population. So, get the facts! And stop your hardcore middle school bullies! ©2005 Permission granted to reprint this article in print or on your web site so long as the paragraph above is included and contact information is provided to the email coach@bullyzapper. com and http:// bullyzapper. com

Middle school bullying get the facts and stop the bullies

Get the facts and stop your middle school hardcore bullies! Documentation is the key to stopping middle school bullying! The more data you have, the more successful you will be. For hardcore bullies, I enlist the help of the team of teachers that has that student currently. I attend one of their team meetings and ask them to document any bullying they see or hear from this particular bully. One teacher, who did not have this particular bully, heard him telling a girl in the hallway that she was fat. She walked out in the hall and asked him to stop. She then reported the incident to her team. At that meeting, I asked the 8th grade teachers to write down any bullying incidents they observe or intervene in and give them to me. When submitting these facts, I submit facts I have from past years on this student. In my opinion, bullies do not start the school year with a clean slate unless they have changed. These incidents from a variety of adults are complied on index cards. When I have enough documentation, I present the cards to the administration to take the appropriate action. Then, we start all over again. Why? Because it takes more than one time to stop a hardcore bully. In our school if the bully does not stop after several office referrals, they are removed from the general student population. So, get the facts! And stop your hardcore middle school bullies! ©2005 Permission granted to reprint this article in print or on your web site so long as the paragraph above is included and contact information is provided to the email coach@bullyzapper. com and http:// bullyzapper. com

Bullying the hazards of growing up

“Come on! It is just part of growing up!” This is what an adult might say to a child if a child complains about being teased at school. Teasing is not usually harmful when done in a friendly and mutual way, and when both kids find it funny. However, when teasing becomes hurtful, unkind, and constant --- it already crosses the line into bullying. Bullying is a deliberate act. It is a desire to hurt or threaten or frighten someone. These usually verbal harassments can come in the form of words or actions. It can be done by one person or more, and can vary in the degree of severity. It can be an “on-and-off” thing, but it usually involves repeated actions by a child or a group of children. It can range from hitting, shoving, name-calling, threats, and mocking to extorting money and treasured possessions. Some kids bully by shunning others and spreading rumors about them. Others use email, chat rooms, instant messages, social networking websites, and text messages to taunt others or hurt their feelings.

It can be one or a number of these, however, verbal abuse is the most common form of bullying. Being a victim of bullying can cause emotional and psychological damage. The effects of ongoing bullying can be long-term, with the harm to the health and well-being of the bullied person lasting into adult life. It damages self-esteem, increases anxiety and can cause serious depression. Bullies are more likely to continue with the aggressive behavior and engage in delinquency and violence. Research shows that bullying can have long-lasting effects, but particularly when it begins in adolescence. People subjected to either verbal or physical bullying are known to be at greater risk for developing depression, anxiety disorders or to behave violently. But not everyone reacts in this way. Children bullied for the first time before they hit puberty seem to get over it, but those who are victimized for the first time late on in puberty seem to become more aggressive or are more likely to turn to drink as a means of coping. People who were bullied revealed slightly higher levels of stress, but while those bullied earlier in life seemed to respond normally to provocation, people bullied for the first time late in puberty are more withdrawn and sensitive to violence.

Bullying is a significant problem in schools and is associated with a range of problems, including poor mental health and violent behavior. Other studies have shown that bullies are more likely to engage in antisocial behavior later in life, particularly assaults and rapes. A research also shows that victims of bullying experience headaches, stomach aches and colds more often than students not involved in bullying. Research into the source of bullying from the perspective of the bully has also begun to focus on vulnerability. Many researchers have suggested that bullies are often themselves victims of bullying and that they may be repeating a pattern of the learned abuse. Equally, it has been suggested that they may be projecting dislike or anger with themselves onto others. If a child approaches an adult and talks about being bullied, focus on offering comfort and support. Children are often reluctant to tell adults about bullying.

They feel embarrassed and ashamed that it's happening. They worry that their parents will be disappointed. The best solution in all cases is strong social support, whether from friends, family or school. Those with no one to share their problems with usually suffered the most. True, that bullying is part of growing up, but bullying can be as upsetting for a child and a family, however, there are a lot of people and resources that are available to help.

The attack of the nerds bullying in cyberspace

We are all familiar with the stereotypical image of the school bully tormenting all of his or her classmates. This can be the cause of increased levels of anxiety and stress among its victims. But with the advent of the Internet comes a different kind of bullying called cyber-bullying. Cyber-bullying, also referred to as electronic bullying, can be defined as the repetitive and willful harassment through the use of the Internet, mobile phones or other forms of interactive and/or digital communication, usually with the intent to humiliate, torment and threaten an individual in order to assert the perpetrator's power over the victim. This kind of bullying is limited to children, pre-teens and teenagers.

If a similar type of aggressive behavior happens to an adult, it is labeled as cyber-harassment or cyber-stalking. All forms of cyber-bullying can be classified as a computer crime punishable by law. Unfortunately, unlike traditional bullying, cyber-bullying is difficult if not impossible to trace. This is because the youthful perpetrator can remain anonymous online, supply false identifying information or constantly change online personas. According to a 2005 study, cyber-bullying can take different forms, such as sending mean, vulgar, or threatening messages or images; posting sensitive, private information about another person; pretending to be someone else in order to make that person look bad; and/or intentionally excluding someone from an online group. This is usually done through e-mails, instant messaging (IM), text or digital imaging messages sent on cell phones, web pages, web logs (blogs), chat rooms or discussion groups, and other information communication technologies. Traditional bullying is distressing enough; however, cyber-bullying is even more terrifying because the harassment can occur continuously at any time of the day or night, with the messages and images distributed quickly to a very wide audience. With the advent of camera phones, perpetrators can take pictures of their intended victim in compromising positions and post it on the Internet. Examples of these can be seen in websites such as YouTube which allows members to post pictures and videos online and subsequently viewed and downloaded worldwide.

It may also be circulated through e-mails in the form of attachments. This increases the humiliation felt by the victim, often heightening the stress and anxiety they feel. Research suggests that more girls are victims and perpetrators of cyber-bullying. Experts suggest that this is because of the passive-aggressive nature of the crime. Unlike boys who can often express these feelings in physical outlets, girls are denied the same privilege for their feelings of anger and aggression for fear of being seen as unfeminine. While cyber-bullying can be violent, this violence is mostly non-confrontational and non-physical, and can be carried out regardless of the size or age difference between the victim and the perpetrator. What matters in this case is the particular expertise in using these information communication technologies. So now, the stereotypical nerd can bully those that may be physically bigger or stronger than they are because they are more technologically-savvy.

Although most victims can opt to ignore the bullying, this will not work for all cases. Unfortunately, because of the nature of the Internet, publishing or posting a defamatory pictures or statements against the victim is extremely difficult to prevent, and these can be viewed or downloaded until it is taken down. Other options would be to change the victim's email address and/or mobile phone number. The best action to take would be to report the incidence of cyber-bullying to an adult, taking care to present the proof of the harassment, in the form of saved mobile messages, e-mails, or videos.