Martin luther king jr teaching tips

Who was born on January 15, 1929? A man who believed in equality and peace...Martin Luther King, Jr. Here are some ways to honor this man. NOTE: If you live in a country other than America, adapt these activities for a significant person in your country's history. 1. Draw a silhouette of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s face against a plain background; then add lines to create a puzzle. Add words that rhyme with 'king' in the spaces of the face and words that rhyme with 'men' in the background. Color the first set of words brown and the second set of words red. NOTE: Vary the activity by adding equal math problems in the face and unequal math problems in the background (ie: 4+6=2+7+1 versus 5+3=2+3+4). 2. Make a Criss-Cross puzzle with these words: Atlanta, dream, equal, laws, leader, minister, peaceful, and prize. 3. Use the same words in Tip 2 to fill in these blanks: Martin Luther King, Jr. was born in _____, Georgia. Dr. King received the Nobel Peace _____. MLK worked to change unfair _____. Dr. King gave a famous speech called "I Have a _____." MLK was a great _____. When he grew up, Martin Luther King, Jr. became a _____. Dr. King believed that all people should be _____. Dr. King believed in _____ protests. 4. Have older children look up the following words in a dictionary, encyclopedia, or the internet: segregation, prejudice, equality, civil rights, nonviolent resistance, protest, demonstrations, equal opportunity, Nobel Peace Prize, assassinated, tribute. What does each word or phrase mean? How can you apply it to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life? 5. As a culminating activity to your unit, have a panel of 'interviewers' ask 'Dr. King' questions. 6. As an alternate activity, have children write a play. Different groups of students can focus on various aspects of Dr. King's life. I hope these ideas are useful and have inspired your own creative thinking. And remember...Reading is FUNdamental! (Answers to Tip 3: Atlanta, prize, laws, dream, leader, minister, equal, peaceful)

Martin luther king jr teaching tips

Who was born on January 15, 1929? A man who believed in equality and peace...Martin Luther King, Jr. Here are some ways to honor this man. NOTE: If you live in a country other than America, adapt these activities for a significant person in your country's history. 1. Draw a silhouette of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s face against a plain background; then add lines to create a puzzle. Add words that rhyme with 'king' in the spaces of the face and words that rhyme with 'men' in the background. Color the first set of words brown and the second set of words red. NOTE: Vary the activity by adding equal math problems in the face and unequal math problems in the background (ie: 4+6=2+7+1 versus 5+3=2+3+4). 2. Make a Criss-Cross puzzle with these words: Atlanta, dream, equal, laws, leader, minister, peaceful, and prize. 3. Use the same words in Tip 2 to fill in these blanks: Martin Luther King, Jr. was born in _____, Georgia. Dr. King received the Nobel Peace _____. MLK worked to change unfair _____. Dr. King gave a famous speech called "I Have a _____." MLK was a great _____. When he grew up, Martin Luther King, Jr. became a _____. Dr. King believed that all people should be _____. Dr. King believed in _____ protests. 4. Have older children look up the following words in a dictionary, encyclopedia, or the internet: segregation, prejudice, equality, civil rights, nonviolent resistance, protest, demonstrations, equal opportunity, Nobel Peace Prize, assassinated, tribute. What does each word or phrase mean? How can you apply it to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life? 5. As a culminating activity to your unit, have a panel of 'interviewers' ask 'Dr. King' questions. 6. As an alternate activity, have children write a play. Different groups of students can focus on various aspects of Dr. King's life. I hope these ideas are useful and have inspired your own creative thinking. And remember...Reading is FUNdamental! (Answers to Tip 3: Atlanta, prize, laws, dream, leader, minister, equal, peaceful)

Martin luther king jr teaching tips

Who was born on January 15, 1929? A man who believed in equality and peace...Martin Luther King, Jr. Here are some ways to honor this man. NOTE: If you live in a country other than America, adapt these activities for a significant person in your country's history. 1. Draw a silhouette of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s face against a plain background; then add lines to create a puzzle. Add words that rhyme with 'king' in the spaces of the face and words that rhyme with 'men' in the background. Color the first set of words brown and the second set of words red. NOTE: Vary the activity by adding equal math problems in the face and unequal math problems in the background (ie: 4+6=2+7+1 versus 5+3=2+3+4). 2. Make a Criss-Cross puzzle with these words: Atlanta, dream, equal, laws, leader, minister, peaceful, and prize. 3. Use the same words in Tip 2 to fill in these blanks: Martin Luther King, Jr. was born in _____, Georgia. Dr. King received the Nobel Peace _____. MLK worked to change unfair _____. Dr. King gave a famous speech called "I Have a _____." MLK was a great _____. When he grew up, Martin Luther King, Jr. became a _____. Dr. King believed that all people should be _____. Dr. King believed in _____ protests. 4. Have older children look up the following words in a dictionary, encyclopedia, or the internet: segregation, prejudice, equality, civil rights, nonviolent resistance, protest, demonstrations, equal opportunity, Nobel Peace Prize, assassinated, tribute. What does each word or phrase mean? How can you apply it to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life? 5. As a culminating activity to your unit, have a panel of 'interviewers' ask 'Dr. King' questions. 6. As an alternate activity, have children write a play. Different groups of students can focus on various aspects of Dr. King's life. I hope these ideas are useful and have inspired your own creative thinking. And remember...Reading is FUNdamental! (Answers to Tip 3: Atlanta, prize, laws, dream, leader, minister, equal, peaceful)

Martin luther king, jr

Martin Luther King, Jr. When you sit back and take in the phenomenal achievements of black history, it is natural to be moved to admiration by some of the great figures of black history including Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver and many more. But one name stands head and shoulders above the rest and that is the name Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King’s legacy of change and his call for the end of racism and segregation in American society is without question the voice that has moved America as no other has done. For while many have showed tremendous leadership, Dr. King clearly demonstrated a vision for the future of America in which black and white worked, lived, played and worshipped together as one society not two. The honor and reverence all American’s have for Martin Luther King, Jr. is evident in how honored his name has become since his tragic death at the assassins hand in 1968. All around this nation, virtually every U. S. city has named a major road after the great civil rights leader. He singularly has a U. S. holiday named after him, an honor usually reserved for presidents. He has been honored on the U. S. stamp and no school child gets through his or her elementary education without knowing the key phrases from Dr. King’s famous “I have a dream” speech. Dr. King’s career in civil rights is inseparable from the early struggles of the civil rights movement from the late fifties going forward. Our images of him walking side by side with his people unifying them behind his leadership and facing tremendous hatred and racial bigotry to take a stand in America to say without compromise that racism would not stand in this country any more. Those images of Dr. King working and marching with others who shared his courage to step out and make a change for the better are indelible on the American consciousness. For Dr. King was not a leader who sent his messages from the safety and comfort of a far away office. No, he was there, in the midst of his people, marching on Washington arm in arm with the everyday men and women of this country who banded together to fight the evils of racism. It took tremendous courage for Dr. King to take to the streets with his people like he did and it was a risk that eventually cost him his life. But his courage inspired thousands to be courageous too and be one people, one brotherhood who would no longer allow racism to be the rule of law in America. Dr. King’s famous speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on a hot August 28, 1963 has become so central to our American heritage that it is quoted with reverence by scholars, students and all people seeking their own inspiration from this great man. This speech ranks with Kennedy’s inaugural speech and the Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address as words that have inspired this nation as none other have been able to do. It is impossible not to get goose bumps reading these key phrases from that historic speech. * I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'" * "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." * "Let freedom ring. And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring—when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children—black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics—will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!" When reading Dr. King’s prophetic words to us all, his ideas become our ideas and we all become challenged to make his dream come to life. And that is what is truly the definition of a great leader. PPPPP 721

Martin luther king, jr

Martin Luther King, Jr. When you sit back and take in the phenomenal achievements of black history, it is natural to be moved to admiration by some of the great figures of black history including Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver and many more. But one name stands head and shoulders above the rest and that is the name Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King’s legacy of change and his call for the end of racism and segregation in American society is without question the voice that has moved America as no other has done. For while many have showed tremendous leadership, Dr. King clearly demonstrated a vision for the future of America in which black and white worked, lived, played and worshipped together as one society not two. The honor and reverence all American’s have for Martin Luther King, Jr. is evident in how honored his name has become since his tragic death at the assassins hand in 1968. All around this nation, virtually every U. S. city has named a major road after the great civil rights leader. He singularly has a U. S. holiday named after him, an honor usually reserved for presidents. He has been honored on the U. S. stamp and no school child gets through his or her elementary education without knowing the key phrases from Dr. King’s famous “I have a dream” speech. Dr. King’s career in civil rights is inseparable from the early struggles of the civil rights movement from the late fifties going forward. Our images of him walking side by side with his people unifying them behind his leadership and facing tremendous hatred and racial bigotry to take a stand in America to say without compromise that racism would not stand in this country any more. Those images of Dr. King working and marching with others who shared his courage to step out and make a change for the better are indelible on the American consciousness. For Dr. King was not a leader who sent his messages from the safety and comfort of a far away office. No, he was there, in the midst of his people, marching on Washington arm in arm with the everyday men and women of this country who banded together to fight the evils of racism. It took tremendous courage for Dr. King to take to the streets with his people like he did and it was a risk that eventually cost him his life. But his courage inspired thousands to be courageous too and be one people, one brotherhood who would no longer allow racism to be the rule of law in America. Dr. King’s famous speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on a hot August 28, 1963 has become so central to our American heritage that it is quoted with reverence by scholars, students and all people seeking their own inspiration from this great man. This speech ranks with Kennedy’s inaugural speech and the Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address as words that have inspired this nation as none other have been able to do. It is impossible not to get goose bumps reading these key phrases from that historic speech. * I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'" * "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." * "Let freedom ring. And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring—when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children—black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics—will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: "Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!" When reading Dr. King’s prophetic words to us all, his ideas become our ideas and we all become challenged to make his dream come to life. And that is what is truly the definition of a great leader. PPPPP 721

Martin luther king's dream

Martin Luther King's Dream In the history of any great people, sometimes there is a singular moment that so sums up that struggle and challenges the hearts of the people of the time that this moment becomes one that is both historic and mythical. In the long history the African American in this country, one such singular moment was the delivery of what has come to be referred to as the “I have a dream” speech during the historic March on Washington in August of 1963. There are many things about this speech that are so poetic that the text of the speech has become one of the great historic texts of the nation’s history as well as of black history. That is why virtually any school child can recite the most stirring words from the speech which are… And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.” I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. What is most striking about this text if you read the entire text is the hope. And it’s a wonderful tradition for every family to read this speech, perhaps on Martin Luther’s King’s birthday which is now a national holiday. Dr. King called upon his people to look up and look with hope toward tomorrow. But more than that, he called on all people to work together toward a shared hope, a hope of fulfilling the American dream that he discusses with such passion in his words. The setting for the speech was on the steps of the Lincoln memorial, within view of the Congress, the reflecting pool and the White House on the National Mall in the center Washington D. C. Dr. King called it hallowed ground reflecting his deep reference and respect for the icons of this country and his deep love of country which too comes through in the speech. But it is a speech of struggle because he spoke of the fact that black people in America were still not living in an openly free and equal status with all other citizens. Dr King did not loose touch with the reality of the tough lives African Americans were living in the United States. That is why this speech is so perfectly crafted and so perfectly delivered. It combines the harsh reality and resolve by black leaders and the African American population to make the world better for themselves and their children with a hope and an optimism that this was a country that would not put up with the oppression and discrimination that has kept black people down ever since slavery. It is a speech that issued a call to action in the time frame of “Now” which was a call to action that many in the houses of power in our country took heed. They did take action immediately to get the process of renewal and repair of a broken social system moving in the right direction. One of the outcomes of this speech was the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964 which changed the fabric of the country forever in the legal restrictions it put on discrimination in every aspect of American life. If it had not been for the “I have a dream” speech, the March on Washington on that hot and humid August day might have just been another in the many protests and events of the civil rights era. Instead it became an iconic moment in American and black history that changed Dr. King into a national hero for black and white people alike and energized a movement and a nation to take matters into their own hands and make thing better for all people. PPPPP 690

The rainbow coalition

The Rainbow Coalition The struggle for freedom and equality for African Americans is one that is passed down from generation to generation and from one era of black leadership to the next. Throughout history, the African American leadership has had many outstanding men and women who made their mark and made a difference for black people in America. And that tradition continues to this day with modern black leadership such as Barrack Obama, The Reverend Al Sharpton and Jessie Jackson. Jessie Jackson has organized his efforts to continue the struggle for civil rights in one of the most innovative organizations in history that came to be known as the Rainbow Coalition. This organization represented the dreams and goals of the Reverend Jackson, to be sure. But it also represents the shared efforts of black Americans across the country in modern times to keep the dream of Martin Luther King alive and moving forward. In fact, the Rainbow Coalition was the outcome of a series of efforts and movements that began with a relationship between Reverend Jackson and Dr. King. It was Martin Luther King that asked Jessie Jackson to head up a movement called Operation Breadbasket, a project to seek the economic improvement of black communities across the country, particularly in the inner city. Operation Breadbasket eventually evolved into a powerful civil rights organization known as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. As these movements started to make a real difference in the lives of African Americans in America, another step was the development of Operation PUSH which stood for People United to Save Humanity. This influential organization has become the cornerstone for promoting civil rights and social justice for African Americans in the last twenty years. It was from these different initiatives and the success they were realizing that the Rainbow Coalition was birthed to seek economic opportunity in the business community and to encourage Fortune 500 companies to hire minorities and to expand their involvement in the nurture and the development of black community for the good of all peoples. The naming of the movement “The Rainbow Coalition” is pivotal to the vision Reverend Jackson had for the civil rights movement. He did not see it as just black people working for the betterment of the black community. Instead, inspired by Martin Luther King’s dream of equality and brotherhood of all races, the coalition would truly be a partnership of all minorities, the white community and other equal rights movements to seek equal opportunity for all of America’s citizens. The important stance that The Rainbow Coalition brought to the consciousness of the black community and to America was the concept that civil rights was not just a black issue. It emphasized that all of America cannot move foreword when a part of the population is left behind to flounder in poverty and without the benefits of a good education and job opportunities. The result is that the black pride that was built by key figures of black history such as Mohammed Ali, Spike Lee and even more radical elements such as Malcolm X and the Black Panthers could now be used to promote true equality in the society. In doing so, Jackson and other contemporary black leaders taught that the African American community not only could be but must insist on being fully black and fully American in their status in American culture. Finally, the Rainbow Coalition emphasized that civil rights is not just a political issue. The emphasis was on all aspects of American life including economic equality, social opportunity and even equal representation in the media and entertainment arts. To be truly represented as an important part of American culture, black Americans must have equal opportunities in all venues. This is the message for its time that Reverend Jackson and the Rainbow coalition has brought and continues to bring to the national stage. And it’s an important message that takes the good that was done in past civil rights movements in this country and brings up to date with a new century. PPPPP 677

King bartholomew and the jester s riddle book review

King Bartholomew and the Jester’s Riddle by Pina Mastromonaco is a wonderful, fun book with a humor level perfect for children aged four to eight. Entertaining riddles entice readers to try to guess the answer while enjoying the tale. Childlike King Bartholomew is obsessed with toys and solving riddles. The chubby, balding King learns to balance play and work time so that he can take responsible care of his land and citizens, yet still enjoy a playful life. The moral-of-the-story is not laid on thick – it is lightly applied so it will be easily accepted by young children. Teachers, librarians and caretakers will enjoy reading this pleasant book to children who like to play rather than accomplish chores or school assignments. The illustrator, David Martin, is extremely accomplished and very gifted. Each page is filled with incredible detail that reveals more the longer one gazes at them. Many illustrations some form of nature included from the fantastically sculpted bushes, an array of birds and a maze of hedges with a big ‘B’ in the center (B – for King Bartholomew). Richly colored clothes and hilarious costumes for the jester and the King’s servants prove to add an interesting twist to this fun-loving book.

" ISBN#: 0974430714 Author: Pina Mastromonaco Illustrations: David Martin Publisher: Merry Lane Press

Black college scholarship student

College Scholarship for Black Student: Passport to Success He was the designated National Spokesman for Nation of Islam, a religious and socio-political organization founded in the United States which is aimed to resurrect the mental, social, spiritual, and economic condition of black men and women in the country as well as on other parts of the world. He is Malcolm X. He was the famous leader of the American civil right movement and won the Nobel Peace Prize because of his promotion of peace and equal treatment of different races throughout the world. He is Martin Luther King, Jr. He is the three-time World Heavyweight Boxing Champion and one of the best pound-for-pound boxers ever existed, which made his way towards the Boxing Hall of Fame. He is Muhammad Ali, or Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. Each of them has their own world to explore and own business to attend. But there is one thing that binds them as one. All of them are African-Americans, or also known as Black Americans. A Black American is considered to be one of the members of an ethnic group in the United States, whose ancestors are traced its roots predominantly in Africa. Majority of them are descendants of African slaves who were transported from Central Africa through the Middle Passage to North America and the Caribbean during the trans-Atlantic slave trade (1609-1807). Others are immigrants from European and African nations who are classified by the United States census as African-American demographically instead of socially. Their population is estimated to be at 40 million and they are predominantly Christians and Muslims. Furthermore, due to hundreds of events that happened within the history of the United States, Black Americans rose from the ethnic ranks and proved themselves to be called a majority class instead of being in the ethnic class. They have triumphed, producing Black American personalities who succeeded in their respective field of endeavors. And all black college students want to succeed in reaching their respective dreams. Despite of the popularity of various Black American personalities, poverty is still within the ranks of several Black American families. They experience difficulties in sending their children to college, particularly in exclusive universities such as Harvard and Yale. They can withstand the discrimination that is still present despite of everything that has happened, yet poverty is what they cannot withstand anymore. Is there any hope for a black student to study in college? Yes, there is. And it is through getting a black college scholarship. There are hundreds of scholarships available that are not just open to White Americans, but are also intended for Black American students. There you have the scholarships for minority students, college scholarships provided by Black American and African organizations (whether civic or religious), and government-sponsored scholarships for black students. The United States Constitution clearly states that there should be no discrimination in terms of getting a solid and well-provided education to its citizens. Whether you are a white or a black, you are entitled to receive a high quality of education in the country. With these scholarships for aspiring black college students, they will be able to fulfill their dreams of becoming one of the successful personalities, just like Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, and Muhammad Ali, who have already left a mark in their respective fields of endeavor. Poverty is just a minor obstacle—there is hope on anything, including for a black student who want to take a step higher and get himself to college.

Disappointing designs

Fred Showker catches a line from a Pete Seeger classic, “Where have all the flowers gone?” His flowers are the web designers that he thinks are going extinct. He laments on the seeming “decay” in the art of web designing and says gone are the designers who made a difference in the making of web designs and who provided quality sites for the people to visit. Showker argues that he has seen a decline in the quality of web sites basing from reviews he made of several sites. From his statements, I can see that he is well-versed in making analyses of web sites and is a credible source of information.

Many sites came under his meticulous scrutiny and not one was spared. Some of the sites that he revisited were dead and others that are still up failed to meet the expected standards. The changes he saw came as a shock since he did not expect many of them to go down the drain. Riddler. com was one site that Showker said proved to be a disappointment as it took out of consideration the reading pleasure of the reader and instead took on a much commercialized look.

Webshaker. com is similar as well. Ben & Jerry’s ice cream was another site that was axe by Showker. Indeed, I was surprise to see a content in the site about the Black History month with Martin Luther King Jr.’s picture in it. I have to agree with Fred on this one as I see no relevance of the content in promoting B&J’s ice cream.

Perhaps there is an underlying purpose for that but I honestly don’t see its bearing here. Of course there are web sites that met Showker’s scrutiny like Hallmark, Camobell Soups and Smuckers. These sites provided a good site for browsing and had a good visual offering for the visitor. Fred Showker’s main thesis in his review is the importance of the reader as an element in the creation of web sites. The site must be tailor-made for the reader for it to reap the fullest benefits. The content must be of relevance to the reader and not just provide a stiff approach to giving out information.

He further adds that a site may come up short on the design aspect but it still should follow this basic concept, "The reader is the most important element in the equation." Style gives way to message, and content is STILL king.

Disappointing designs

Fred Showker catches a line from a Pete Seeger classic, “Where have all the flowers gone?” His flowers are the web designers that he thinks are going extinct. He laments on the seeming “decay” in the art of web designing and says gone are the designers who made a difference in the making of web designs and who provided quality sites for the people to visit. Showker argues that he has seen a decline in the quality of web sites basing from reviews he made of several sites. From his statements, I can see that he is well-versed in making analyses of web sites and is a credible source of information. Many sites came under his meticulous scrutiny and not one was spared. Some of the sites that he revisited were dead and others that are still up failed to meet the expected standards.

The changes he saw came as a shock since he did not expect many of them to go down the drain. Riddler. com was one site that Showker said proved to be a disappointment as it took out of consideration the reading pleasure of the reader and instead took on a much commercialized look. Webshaker. com is similar as well. Ben & Jerry’s ice cream was another site that was axe by Showker. Indeed, I was surprise to see a content in the site about the Black History month with Martin Luther King Jr.’s picture in it. I have to agree with Fred on this one as I see no relevance of the content in promoting B&J’s ice cream.

Perhaps there is an underlying purpose for that but I honestly don’t see its bearing here. Of course there are web sites that met Showker’s scrutiny like Hallmark, Camobell Soups and Smuckers. These sites provided a good site for browsing and had a good visual offering for the visitor. Fred Showker’s main thesis in his review is the importance of the reader as an element in the creation of web sites. The site must be tailor-made for the reader for it to reap the fullest benefits. The content must be of relevance to the reader and not just provide a stiff approach to giving out information.

He further adds that a site may come up short on the design aspect but it still should follow this basic concept, "The reader is the most important element in the equation." Style gives way to message, and content is STILL king.

Building better citizens

Children are never too young to learn how to be good citizens. "Explain to your children that they are citizens of many communities-their town, the country and the world," says Sharon Bergen, senior vice president of education and training for Knowledge Learning Corporation, the nation's leading provider of early childhood care and education. "Most important," says Bergen, "is for parents to model good citizenship." Bergen suggests parents explain to their children that being good citizens means caring about others. She offers these tips: Start by encouraging citizenship at the local level. Encourage your children to help elderly neighbors-without payment. At school, they can organize a recycling drive to benefit a local charity. Instill the habit of volunteerism by helping at a library or animal shelter. Children can learn to appreciate their heritage. For example, parents can explain why Americans celebrate the Fourth of July and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday. To drive home the concept that we are all citizens of the world, teach respect for the environment and for other cultures. As a family, join a cleanup project on Earth Day or contribute time and money to assist victims of natural disasters worldwide. With a little effort, children will grow up to take seriously their citizenship in the many communities in which they live.

Detroit school district makes connection to minorities

The Detroit School District is making an effort to connect to the minority students and minority businesses in the community. Detroit School District Makes an Effort to Attract Minority Businesses The Detroit School District’s Department of Contracting and Procurement has created a special community outreach program which gives immediate notification to certified minority businesses when bids are posted. These bids are used to determine which businesses will provide construction or services for the Detroit School District. This program, known as the Detroit Public Schools Small Contractor Development Initiative Program, provides businesses notification when the Detroit School District’s Department of Contracting and Procurement bids are solicited. The Detroit School District has created DemandStar. com, bidding notification system. It informs businesses about, among other things, invitations to bid, Request for Proposal, Request for Qualification and Request for Information. This could become a huge boon for minority businesses in the area because large some of money are spent each year by the Detroit School District’s Department of Contracting and Procurement. The District is reaching out to minority businesses in several other ways as well. It advertises regularly in the newspapers that target the minority communities including the Michigan Chronicle, El Central and the Arab-American News. The Detroit School District has fostered connections with various chambers of commerce or business groups that have large minority memberships, such as the Arab-American Chamber of Commerce, the Detroit Black Chamber and the Booker T. Washington Business Association. The Detroit School District’s Department of Contracting and Procurement also has plans to help minority own businesses make connections to major contractors and encourage them to use the minority businesses as sub-contractors. The Detroit School District Encourages Minority Students In 1980 the Detroit News and the Detroit School District created the Rosa Parks Scholarship Awards. These awards are given every year and all Detroit School District high school seniors are eligible but an emphasis is placed on minority students who want to pursue journalism in college. The awards are administered by the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation. The winners are selected based on the community service, financial need and academic achievement of the students. While the Detroit News awards two additional scholarships to students who are aspiring journalists. The scholarship awards are worth two thousand dollars each. In 2006 Rosa Parks Scholarship Awards yielded a wide variety of students from different high schools across the Detroit School District. Some of the winners this year of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Awards were: Ronald Berry, Chadsey High School, Rebrika Blalock, Detroit Technology High School, Adrienne Carter, Northwestern High School, Ashley Carter, Northwestern High School, Danielle Clayton, Denby High School, Latisha Gladney-Taylor, Davis Aerospace Technical High School, Veronica Grandison, Communication and Media Arts High School, Anthony Head, Jr., Mumford High School, Dana Hill, Mumford High School, Delissa Jackson, Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School, Angelina Jordan, Renaissance High School, Daryel Peake, Mumford High School, Samuel Williams, Jr., Davis Aerospace Technical High School, Noelle Williams, Renaissance High School, Darryl Woods, Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School. One of the Detroit News Rosa Parks Scholarship Award winners was Redell Willis, Chadsey High School. Miss Willis plans to head to Wayne State University in the fall, where she will major in journalism.

A troubled time

A Troubled Time From 1955 to 1965 there was a war right in the middle of America. No, it wasn’t a war like World War II or the Revolutionary War. It was a war for the heart and soul of this country to determine once and for all if America was really going to be a land of equal opportunity for all. It is a war that eventually took on the name of “The Civil Rights Movement.” We must make no mistake, this was not just a shouting match. Some of the events that we even remember today became quite brutal and deadly. Those who fought in this war on both sides were deadly serious about the causes they represented and willing to fight and even die to see their cause succeed. The war waged for years and steady progress was made but not without tremendous sacrifice by the leaders of the movement who were committed to a giving a new meaning to the phrase “set my people free.” In all of black history, there may be no more significant a time since the Civil War when the rights of African Americans were so deeply fought and won. The tensions in the country had been building. When the Supreme Court mandated desegregation in the schools in the historic case Brown versus the Board of Education, the stage was set. But it was on December 1, 1955 when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama to a white man that the movement finally took shape and became a titanic struggle for the rights of African Americans in America. That first battle brought to the front line one of the most important figures to fight for Civil Rights of that era, the Reverend Martin Luther King. This tremendous struggle for freedom was never easy and was often marked with violence. Over the next ten years some of the most important milestone in black history took place including… * 1957 – President Eisenhower had to send federal troops to Arkansas to secure admission to Central High School by nine black students. * 1960 – The sit-in at Woolworths lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina set the stage for nonviolent protest that was used with great success for the rest of the struggle. Nonviolent protest and civil disobedience became a staple of the civil rights movement because of the influence of Martin Luther King. * 1963 – The historic March on Washington in which over 200,000 people gathered to hear Dr. Kings famous “I Have a Dream” speech. * 1964 – President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill that was the most significant event of his presidency and one he believed deeply in, the Civil Rights Act of 1964. * 1965 – The assignation of Malcolm X and the Watts race rights. * 1965 – President Johnson takes another bold step to accelerate the civil rights movement implementing Affirmative Action when he issues Executive Order 11246. This short list is just a few of the highlights of this troubled time in which the rights of all citizens of American, black and white and of all colors were being redefined both on the streets, in the courts and in the different branches of government. In the years to come there would be great steps forward. One by one, every area of American life would see breakthroughs by African Americans in the areas of sports, entertainment, education and politics. There were many proud moments and there were moments of tremendous shame and heinous acts committed by both white and black people. But through all that struggle, the society continued to grow and adapt to the will of the people as has always been the tradition in American culture. The struggle is far from over. Discrimination and hate speech continue to be a problem to this day. And while it is easy to reflect on those days of struggle with regret, we can also look at them with pride. We can be proud of the great leaders who demonstrated tremendous courage and wisdom to lead this nation to a better way of life. And we can be proud of America because it is here where such a struggle can result in equality and freedom for all citizens, not just a few. PPPPP 716

Capricorn

Capricorn If you are a Capricorn (December 22 to January 20), you are a personality to be reckoned with, but in a quiet, subtle way. These are people who will achieve whatever goal they set for themselves. They have the grit and determination to see out a project or an objective, no matter how long it takes. They are surprisingly witty, when they allow themselves to be, although they’re not the fiery, flashy kind. A Capricorn will always be on time, will always have positions of responsibility. They make good psychologists because of their ability to listen to short-tempered people or people on a rant. They have an ability to stay calm and reasoned in a disagreement or conflict, even though the other side may be more passionate. They are deep thinkers who have good memories and a never-ending intellectual curiosity. In their relationships, they can have a tendency towards unhappiness. Capricorns set very high standards for themselves, and can be easily disappointed if others don’t set equally high standards. Professionally, they are strongly attracted to music, although their logical side also makes them excellent bankers. Some famous Capricorns include Anwar Sadat and Martin Luther King. Paul Cezanne and Henri Matisse were also Capricorns. Other famous Capricorns include Richard Nixon, Simone de Beauvoir and Edgar Allen Poe. After the Age of Aquarius in the zodiac Great Year (approximately 2000-4000 CE) will come the Age of Capricorn. It’s hard to predict what the human condition will be by then. Will we have moved on to other planets and solar systems. If the Age of Aquarius is to be marked by humanitarianism and greater understanding among the people on Earth, (we hope!), what will define the Age of Capricorn. Will we achieve the goals of Aquarius. Many people look towards the new millennium and the beginning of a new era in the Great Year with hope that we will have learned from the mistakes of the past. Hopefully we will continue to learn and in the Age of Capricorn will have evolved to even greater human potential.