Diabetes epidemic because of self inflicted obesity

One of the greatest contributors to the type 2 diabetes epidemic is reckoned to be obesity brought on by our modern lifestyles. Are you eating yourself into diabetes type 2? Check if you have these 4 eating habits that could contribute to obesity and possibly make you part of the type 2 diabetes epidemic... 1) Unconscious eating... No, I don't mean 'sleep-eating' (I wonder if there is such a thing?) I'm talking about automatic eating without any conscious thought to what is happening. How often do you do something else whilst eating? Watching TV; reading a book; reading a magazine or newspaper; listening to music, a radio show or conversation? If you're anything like me it's probably a rare occasion when you just sit and have a meal, without interruptions. A recent study carried out by Penn State laboratory showed pre-school children, who consistently watch TV whilst eating, ate up to 33% more than they did when they had a meal without the TV on. How much extra do you eat, without realizing it, because you are absorbed in a book or TV program? 2) Eating speed.. Ever finished your meal before others? Ever bolted your food down and then felt bloated afterwards? In a recent Sky TV program Paul McKenna (the famous hypnotherapist) explained how the simple act of slowing down whilst eating; putting your knife and fork down between mouthfuls, can contribute to weight loss. Think about it, if you're eating more slowly you'll know when you are full. You won't continue eating and get that uncomfortable bloated feeling. And you won't put extra weight on. Watching that program gave me an 'Aha!' moment, because that's exactly what my father has done all his life. It's a standing joke in the family that he takes so long to eat a meal - he often finishes half-an-hour after everyone else. And guess what? Yep - he's as skinny as a rake. Wish I could say the same about me! 3) Snacking... Are you really hungry when you snack? Or is it that you "just fancy a bite to eat"? Snacking is probably one of the biggest contributions to weight gain. It's not so much the snacking, it's what you snack on! Cookies /biscuits, chocolate, cakes, snack bars - all these contain massive amounts of sugar that increase the burden on our immune system. If you overload your system with sugar it may not cope, you could end up with insulin resistance and that leads to type 2 diabetes. Healthy, no added sugar or sugar free snacks are the best options if you MUST snack. 4) Sugary drinks... Do you have a favorite soft drink? If you do, is it a sugar-sweetened drink or a concentrated sugar-rich fruit juice? And, on a hot day, how much do you drink of that favorite? Half-a-liter? One liter? It's all added sugar, which not only impacts on your weight, it also impacts on your body's control of the sugar levels in your blood. In a recent medical study in the US the results indicated that having just one sugar sweetened drink of fruit juice every day made women more susceptible to becoming part of the type 2 diabetes epidemic, by up to 80%. So, are you planning to be part of the diabetes epidemic? OK, maybe you're not PLANNING to... but maybe your unconscious eating habits have got you on that slippery slope to diabetes. A little thought about what you eat, where and how, can reduce the risk for you.

Low carb diets and diabetes

In a low-carb diet, the carbohydrate intake is limited to about 5 to 10 percent, such that protein and fats take precedence in one’s eating habits, to be able to keep sated and avoid bouts of hunger. It is in maintaining that feeling of fullness that one is able to avoid craving for sweets, and this is a good reason for diabetics to adopt a diet that is low in carbohydrates to control their condition. Following this type of diet prevents excessive consumption of carbohydrates, which leads to higher levels of blood sugar. Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to properly take in starch and sugar. For a diet to work in favor of a diabetic, it has to be low in fat, high in fiber, and packed with minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals, and antioxidants.

Keeping to the kinds of food with low glycemic index is also important. Foods that are permitted in low-carb diets are meat, poultry, eggs, cheese, fish, and some selected vegetables. Although some sources say that to eliminate carbohydrates altogether is not recommended for diabetics, as carbohydrates in the diet are vital, because they serve as the main resource of energy and nutrients within our bodies. In a diabetic’s diet, carbohydrates in excessive amounts may be frowned at, but authorities recommend a daily dosage of not less than 130 grams. On the other hand, studies have shown that the low-carb diet caused no undesirable effects on the levels of insulin, glucose, blood pressure or cholesterol.

It is also worthwhile to note that one can alter a diet according to his or her specific needs. In this regard, before following any diet, be sure to check with your physician to make sure you will be getting all the right nutrients that will help you control your condition. Doing so will also help you pinpoint areas of the regimen that you should alter for a more appropriate eating habit. The effects of limiting the amount of carbohydrates in your diet manifest as loss of weight due to a lesser calorie intake, or the successful maintenance of your ideal weight. Remember that with weight loss, the body’s blood sugar and insulin levels naturally improve. Even just a 10 percent weight loss is a substantial improvement towards being in better control of diabetes. Also, when weight loss is part of your goal of achieving better health to make your condition more bearable, then a carefully planned diet is best paired with an exercise routine that is easy enough to follow. Daily walks and a couple of dozen repetitions with free weights are good low-impact exercises you can adopt.

Regular exercise doesn’t only help combat diabetes; it also promotes a sense of well-being that helps you maintain the right attitude towards living a healthier life for good.

5 diabetes travel tips

Planning ahead when you travel reduces stress. This is particularly important for a diabetic. These 5 diabetes travel tips are simple to implement and crucial to your diabetic management. They are particularly important if you are traveling abroad. 1) Have a pre-travel check-up. Make sure your A1C blood sugar levels; your blood pressure and your cholesterol levels are OK. Get the appropriate shots for any country you plan to visit. 2) Wear a diabetes medical ID. Ideally it should be in the language spoken in the country you're visiting. Not everyone speaks your language and you don't want medical problems through misunderstandings. 3) Keep your medication and glucose snacks in your hand-luggage. Check-in baggage does, unfortunately, go astray. Don't risk your diabetes medication by packing it in your main luggage. 4) Keep your medication in its original box, complete with pharmacy labels. It will prevent misunderstandings about why you are carrying drugs and, if you are on insulin, syringes. 5) Be aware of time zone changes, especially when altering your watch. Remember when you travel east your day becomes shorter; if you travel west your day becomes longer. You may need to alter the timings of your medication. Traveling need not be traumatic. A sensible attitude and a bit of pre-travel planning can make things go far more smoothly.

5 ways to manage your diet for diabetes

: Since my diagnosis with diabetes at the age of eleven, my own diet has changed dramatically. I maintain my current healthy weight with a great diet/eating plan. If you do plan on losing more than about a stone in weight then I would visit your doctor for more tips on how to do this without risk. I've had diabetes for seven years now, but to tell you that how I maintain weight is perfect would be totally wrong of me. However, I can advise you to follow my steps because I know what works and what doesn't. Before I really begin I must also say that I have been brought up by great parents who taught me to eat everything, and so I do! If there is something that you don't like, there are loads of other diabetic recipes and ideas that you will eat and appreciate. I am a university student and I like to buy fresh and organic produce from where I live. I believe that this is important because it can be the most good for your body and contain more nutrients and vitamins than most supermarket produce.

I like to source food from my fortnightly farmers market in town, which sells amazing meat and dairy produce and fresh in season fruit and vegetables. This is another important thing to remember, that eating fruit and vegetables in their season means that they will taste better as well as doing you good. I have a lot of influence from Western European cuisine (mainly France and Italy) as you will tell, but I do not profess to be a chef and everything is easy to make and very convenient. I have read countless diet books and diabetic recipe/diet books, and I came to a conclusion that I think really works. I fused all the good things from the diets (but not from every diet) and sort of put together my own one. I call this my Juvenile Diabetes Healthy Diet! The "rules" that I would lay down are as follows: 1. Cut back on snacks and then change the type of snacks you eat. Certainly my biggest downfall although it wasn't really apparent to me. When I first started at University, I had little or no routine which meant that filling my day was difficult and popping into the kitchen for a snack, no matter how healthy it felt, was a regular occurence. This is one of the hardest things to do for some people, but establishing a great routine is essential to great diabetes care. The types of snacks to be eating are unsalted nuts, dried unsweetened fruit, fresh fruit, fresh vegetables (I love fresh red pepper and cucumber), dark chocolate (richer and nicer and you only want 2 squares usually).

2. Cut back on white flour and embrace wholemeal carbs. This is the most essential part of your diet, and the thing that can show the biggest increase in loss of weight. Some diets in fact jsut focus on this point, and are very successful. Wholemeal (especially stoneground wholemeal) is so good for you and has so much more flavour in it that switching is much easier than you think. Most people are really surprised at the ranges you can get in you supermarket, again remember that the bread that is best for you is the one that is freshest with least perservatives or added ingredients. Also, brown or basmati rice is great with a lovely nutty texture. Wholemeal pasta is great and for your potatoes I would totally recommend the smaller new potatoes.

3. Stop drinking cocktails, start drinking wine. Cocktails are full of sugar, colourants and preservatives. As a student I have had loads of practice at going out and not drinking cocktails, so my drink of choice is Malibu and Diet Coke if I feel I have to drink something and I make it last all night. I can then top up with Diet Coke (which has almost no sugar in it) and it looks as though I am drinking Malibu, who is to know. If you are out at a restaurant, red wine is much better than anything else you can order, (except water of course!

) and it has been proven that the anti-oxidants in red wine are great for keeping a healthy heart. The recommended amount is one glass a day with your evening meal. 4. Start cooking more fruit and vegetables. Fresh fruit and vegetables are a great way to get all the vitamins and minerals you need. And there are so many different ways in which to cook vegetables, but I find that raw is the best followed closely by steamed. Both of these ways preserve all their natural goodness as well. I will follow this post with another diabetes recipes post. 5. Drink more water.

I know you have heard people say this many times before, but the benefits of drinking more water are endless. A few tips on how to get more water into your day are firstly to put bottles of water at all the places you go in the house or work. So keep one in your desk, on your desk, a glass in the kitchen, the bedroom, the sitting room, etc. Try and drink all these glasses up and you will be well on your way to 8 glasses a day. The trick is to add a glass every few days or so, if you try to drink all that water in one go you won't be so inclined to drink 8 glasses again, trust me! Have a go, it's amazing how great you will feel. For further tips on living with diabetes, visit Juvenile Diabetes blogspot This article was submitted by Alissa Carter, she is also owner & creator of the Prom dresses website.

Type two diabetes

Diabetes is a serious disease that needs to have medical attention as soon as some symptoms begin to surface. The reason why diabetes is serious is because it will cause the body to shut down and you will go into sugar shock. After sugar, shock the body will go into a coma and a person may never come out of the comatose state. Diabetes, in general, can cause the body to stop circulating the blood flow properly and that’s why many diabetics have to have parts of their body amputated. Diabetics also have a higher change of developing kidney, pancreas, and other organ diseases. Type two diabetes will usually affect people much older than that of type one. It is the most common type of diabetes and effects thousands of people each day. It is also referred to as adult onset diabetes. Typically, it is due to being overweight, but there are exceptions to the rule. Type one is where your body lacks insulin and type one is where you body will begin to resist insulin.

This type is developed by usually genetics and often is passed down through generations. The insulin levels with type two diabetics are sometimes normal, but the body won’t respond to it. This will create higher blood levels because the body is not using the glucose up. When you have type one you are considered to have symptoms of hyperglycemia, however you will have the opposite reaction with type two and have hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is where you have low blood sugar. It is from the fact that your body cannot provide enough energy for the activities of the body. It will cause you to be hungry much like type one. It will also make you very nervous or shaky.

You will perspire more than the average person and you will become dizzy or light headed. You will become over anxious or weak which will cause you to have difficulty speaking or feeling restless. You will also become confused and possibly hallucinate. Because of your anxiety, you may have nightmares or perspire so much during sleep that your entire bed becomes wet or damp. You will often wake up tired, irritable, and confused.

Type two is the most common type of diabetes and exists in all cultures. It is often the result from obesity and it is doesn’t discriminate ethnically or racially. Obesity has become a problem for today’s world and has been found as a tendency to promote diabetes rather it’s genetically enhanced or not. The causes of the disease have many factors to blame, but genetics seem to be the strongest factor. Obesity is also found to be genetically enhanced and the two could be related somehow. Treatment is simple, it is taken orally to lower the blood sugar which can cause hypoglycemia and at some point insulin injections may be needed. You can find more information on http:// all-about-diabetes-symptom. com/

Diabetes and your heart

: Diabetes is one condition that must be treated as soon as it is diagnosed, even though in its early stages it doesn't hurt, or cause inconvenience, or create any worrisome symptoms. But ignoring it is a mistake, because the blood sugar imbalance we diabetics live with can cause a variety of complications, even leading to other serious health conditions. One major cause for concern is adverse effects on our hearts. Our unstable blood sugar levels can cause poor circulation—a big step on the road to heart problems. Here are some things to watch for. Hypertension Diabetes often goes hand-in-hand with high blood pressure, or hypertension. In fact, your doctor will tell you that diabetics must work to get their blood pressure down even lower than other people. While a systolic pressure (the top number) of 140 might be acceptable for the general population, we diabetics should aim for 130 or lower.

It's all part of the battle against possible heart disease. Blood fats Cholesterol and tryglycerides, or blood fats, also need to be kept lower in diabetics. Lots of fruits and vegetables, fewer packaged or fried foods are your best bets for dietary blood fat control. Throw out that frying pan! Blood sugar Blood sugar levels need monitoring too, as consistently high levels damage blood vessels and can lead to cardiovascular difficulties.

Weight level And of course you know it's important to maintain a healthy weight. Why is that particularly important for us diabetics? First, if you are overweight your heart muscle needs to work harder to pump blood through your system. This weakens your blood vessels, which are then more susceptible to damage from fluctuating blood sugar levels. It's a vicious cycle you don't want to create. Your heart is the main engine of your whole body, so you need to do everything possible to keep it in good shape. For the sake of a healthy heart, take control of your diabetes.

Sopranos star takes control of diabetes

Aida Turturro, the actress who plays Janice Soprano on the HBO series "The Sopranos," is one of the more than 20 million Americans who have diabetes. Turturro was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (where the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not use the insulin properly) in 2000. For more than a year after her initial diagnosis she was in denial and did not take the proper steps-such as diet and exercise-to manage the disease. Finally, her doctor told her that her blood sugar levels were too high and if she did not learn how to manage the disease, she would suffer serious complications. "As soon as I started learning more about the potential complications of the disease, I realized I should have taken action sooner," said Turturro.

"It is scary what can happen to you if you do not take control of your diabetes." Turturro was among the more than 50 percent of diabetes patients whose A1C levels are above the target goal of 7 percent as established by the American Diabetes Association. Patients with diabetes should know their A1C level. It is a simple blood test that assesses glucose levels over a two - to three-month period. In addition to her diet and exercise routines, Turturro worked with her doctor to develop a treatment regimen that was right for her. At first she was taking oral medications but was still unable to get her blood sugar levels under control. About two years ago, Turturro and her doctor added Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection), the once-daily, true 24-hour basal insulin, to her treatment plan. With a treatment regimen that includes Lantus and other diabetes medications, Turturro achieves good blood glucose control with an A1C level below seven percent. "Managing diabetes is not easy. What I have learned is the best way to manage the disease is by becoming educated, motivated and an advocate for yourself," said Turturro. "It is a 24-hour disease and you have to put in a real effort to keep your blood sugar levels under control." Note to Editors: Important Safety Information for Lantus Lantus is indicated for once-daily subcutaneous administration, at the same time each day, for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients (6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes mellitus or adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who require basal (long-acting) insulin for the control of hyperglycemia. Lantus must not be diluted or mixed with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Lantus is contraindicated in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or the excipients. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin, including Lantus. As with all insulins, the timing of hypoglycemia may differ among various insulin formulations. Glucose monitoring is recommended for all patients with diabetes. Any change of insulin type and/or regimen should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Concomitant oral antidiabetes treatment may need to be adjusted. Other adverse events commonly associated with Lantus include the following: lipodystrophy, skin reactions (such as injection-site reaction, pruritus, rash) and allergic reactions.

Diabetes what type of insulin is right for me

Rapid onset-fast acting insulin Rapid onset-fast acting insulin always looks clear. It is fast acting and starts to work within one to 20 minutes. It peaks about one hour later and lasts from three to five hours. When you use this type of insulin, you must eat immediately after you inject. The two rapid onset-fast acting insulin types currently available are: 1. NovoRapid (Insulin Aspart) 2. Humalog (Lispro). Short acting insulin Short acting insulins always look clear. They begin to lower blood glucose levels within half an hour, so you need to have your injection half an hour before eating. Short acting insulin has a peak effect at two to four hours, and lasts for between six and eight hours. Short acting insulin types currently available include: 1. Actrapid 2. Humulin 3. Hypurin Neutral (bovine - highly purified beef insulin). Intermediate acting insulin Intermediate acting insulins always look cloudy. They have either protamine or zinc added to delay their action. These insulins begin to work about 90 minutes after you inject, peak at four to 12 hours, and last for 16 to 24 hours. Intermediate acting insulins currently available include: 1. With protamine added – Protaphane, Humulin NPH and Hypurin Isophane (bovine). Preventing Diabetes You'll need to keep an eye on your blood sugar levels and take treatment for your diabetes for the rest of your life. If you don't have good control of your blood sugar you'll be at risk from damage to the blood vessels and nerves, with problems such as deterioration in eyesight, stroke, kidney disease and infections. As your doctor has already explained, careful diet and pills are all that are needed in most cases. If you're overweight, simply eating less and losing weight can be enough to allow the insulin to work more effectively. Why Use Insulin Pumps? The number of people using insulin pump therapy to manage their diabetes is growing rapidly; roughly 250,000 people around the world use an insulin pump. Their reasons for choosing the pump are many, but generally "pumpers" all agree that it gives them tighter control and more flexibility -- both in terms of their schedule and lifestyle. This control and flexibility includes advantages such as: 1. Eating what you want, when you want 2. Worrying less about low blood sugars ("hypoglycemia") 3. Living life on your terms, not a schedule of snacks and shots There are many scientific studies that demonstrate that insulin pump therapy results in better outcomes for teens and adults with type 1 diabetes. There are also studies that show that insulin pump therapy works well in toddlers and pre-school children.

Glycemic index diets can help to control blood sugar level

Study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition findings are that assessing a meal using the glycemic index, which lists the quality of carbohydrates contained in many common foods, appears to be a good way to predict the effect a meal will have on blood sugar levels, this is important information for diabetes patients. Dr. Thomas M. S. Wolever, of the University of Toronto and colleagues examined whether overall carbohydrate content and glycemic index of individual foods, as given in published tables, determined the effects of a realistic mixed meal on the blood sugar in normal subjects. The team measured the responses to six test meals in 16 subjects in Sydney and eight meals in 10 subjects in Toronto, and then pooled the results. The meals varied in amount of calories, protein, fat, available carbohydrates and glycemic index score. The blood sugar and insulin responses to the Sydney test meals varied over a 3-fold range. For the Toronto test meals, the blood sugar responses varied over a 2.4-fold range. The team found no correlation between the blood sugar levels and fat or protein content of the test meal, but there was a significant correlation with carbohydrate content and glycemic index alone, which accounted for 88 percent of the variation in the blood sugar response. This findings show that the glycemic index works and diabetes patients can use glycemic index diets but should be monitored and use thier prscribed theraphy.

Diabetes treatment and info all you need to know

Diabetes is a critical health care problem for many people throughout the world. It decreases quality of life and, in many cases, it can also shorten one's life. The good news is that when you recognize the seriousness of being a diabetic and take constructive steps toward controlling it all of these things above decrease in importance. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism. The way our bodies use digested food for growth and energy. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body.

Diabetes is widely recognized as one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. Conventional Medical Treatment Insulin was the first, and remains the primary means of treatment for Type 1 diabetes and is administered by subcutaneous injection. This method is necessary since insulin is destroyed by gastric stomach secretions when it is taken by mouth. Insulin injections must be balanced with meals and daily activities, and glucose levels must be closely monitored through frequent blood sugar testing. Many diabetics need inject insulin only once a day; others require two or more injections. The usual time for a dose of insulin is before breakfast. The dosage is initially established according to the severity of the condition, but it often has to be reassessed as one or another of the variables in the person's condition changes. Medicines for Type2 Diabetes Metformin this is often the first medicine that is advised for type 2 diabetes. It mainly works by reducing the amount of glucose that your liver releases into the bloodstream. Sulphonylureas for example, glibelclamide, gliclazide, glimerpirizide, glipizide, gliquidone, increase the amount of insulin produced by your pancreas. They also make your body's cells more sensitive to insulin so that more glucose is taken up from the blood. Type 1 (Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus) Type 1 diabetes is treated with intensive insulin therapy. This type of treatment is designed to achieve near-normal blood sugars safely - while keeping the episodes of low blood sugars ("insulin reactions") to a minimum. Insulin therapy includes: * Multiple Daily Injections of Insulin (Flexibility is important!). * Use of Insulin Pens or Pumps. * Use of new type of insulin: Lispro or Humlog (extremely fast-acting) - replaces regular insulin. Diabetes Medications Sulfonylureas: Glyburide (Micronase, Diabeta) and Glipizide (Glucotrol). Traditional medicines - cheap, easy to take, work well with many people. Stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas. Problems: Doesn't always achieve normal blood sugars and may cause low blood sugars. Metformin (Glucophage): Used in Europe for many years. Decreases sugar production by the liver, which contributes to elevated blood sugar levels. Works well with insulin. Problems: Causes gastro-intestinal upset in some, and cannot be used if you have serious heart or kidney problems. People with diabetes will experience many long-term and serious complications. These complications will affect virtually every part of the body from the feet and legs to the internal organs. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or use insulin properly therefore it is up to you and your doctor to learn how to manipulate the functions of your body properly to offset or minimize the complications of uncontrolled diabetes. With proper control you can still live a healthy and long life but it helps to be a fanatic about controlling your diabetes.

How to control your diabetes for life

Here's what researchers know about controlling blood glucose (blood sugar) in people with diabetes: It's not easy, but it can be done. It takes hard work. And it can save your life. An important new study by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) shows that tight control of blood glucose can reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes-the number one killer of people with diabetes-by more than half. For most people with diabetes, keeping blood glucose under tight control isn't easy.

The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggest that fewer than 45 percent of Americans with diabetes are reaching the level of control seen in the NIH study. But it can be done, and the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has materials that can help. The National Diabetes Education Program's Control Your Diabetes. For Life. campaign materials teach people with diabetes how to know their ABCs-what their A1C (a test of blood glucose), Blood pressure, and Cholesterol numbers are, what they should be, and how to work with their health care team to reach those goals. The materials also offer ideas for sticking to a healthy eating plan, ways to stay active with regular physical activity, and other tips for feeling better and staying healthy. NDEP materials are easy to read, and available in English, Spanish, and in 15 Asian and Pacific Islander languages.

They have been tailored for groups at high risk for diabetes, including American Indians and Alaska Natives, African Americans, and Hispanics/Latinos. And all NDEP materials are based on science, backed by the federal government, and copyright free. For people with diabetes, controlling blood glucose-along with blood pressure and cholesterol-can save their sight, their limbs and their life.

Diabetes today the disturbing truth

Diabetes is the fifth-deadliest disease. Since 1987 the death rate has increased 45 percent. In 2002; diabetes claimed an astonishing 224,092 lives in the United States alone. It is believed that the number was actually higher since most deaths of the elderly had multiple chronic conditions associated with their death including diabetes. Many people do not know that they have diabetes until they develop other life threatening conditions such as, heart disease, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney damage, nervous system damage, dental disease, sexual dysfunction, and a number of other complications. When you have diabetes the above complication are side illnesses, diabetes is this root of all of your medical problems and must be under control for you to recover from the side illnesses period! Being checked by your physician on a regular basis is absolutely necessary for your overall quality of life. If you do not know that you have diabetes, there is no other way of knowing that you have this deadly disease without a check up. There are several different types of diabetes such as, type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 is the body's inability to produce insulin, people with type 1 are insulin dependent for the remainder of their lives, and they must also keep close track of their diets. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes; diabetes is a chronic disease and has no cure. While an estimated 14 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes it is also estimated that close to 6.2 million are unaware that they have this deadly disease. In 2005 1.5 million new cases were diagnosed in people age 20 and above. If this dangerous trend continues it is believed that 1 in 3 Americans will develop diabetes in their lifetime. It is also estimated that 41 million Americans have pre-diabetes today. Pre-diabetes is a dangerous condition in itself, this is when the glucose level in the blood is not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes yet damage is being done to your internal organs. The body can not handle any unsafe level of sugar or glucose in the blood for any extended period of time. Diabetes is the body's inability to use the sugar called glucose. Glucose is created when the body breaks down food for energy. The hormone insulin opens up the cells in the body to allow glucose to enter into the cell and be used as fuel. In diabetes the cell never opens up and the glucose flows through the blood stream causing high blood sugar levels. With diabetes the body either dose not make enough insulin or is resistant to its own natural insulin. High blood sugar can lead to very serious complications. Heart disease is the leading cause of premature death in people with diabetes. Diabetes is the major cause of leg and foot amputations in Americans today. Infections are much harder to control in people with diabetes, they are at greater risk of complications and death due to infection. The high risk factors leading to type 2 diabetes is too much body fat and high sugar intake! Diabetes is on the rise; Americans are eating poorly and are lacking physical activity and this is starting to really show in the children of America. Free-radicals are very active in a person with diabetes. They attack a number of cells at once because diabetes causes an abnormal immune function due to high glucose levels in the blood and organs. Free-radicals are the reason you see so many different complications or side illnesses in this disease. Free-radicals are molecules or atoms that are missing an electron, free-radicals attack healthy cells trying to steal an electron from them. Chronic inflammation is also a major player with this disease and in the side illnesses. Chronic inflammation is being called the silent killer by doctors and scientists. All of the above diseases need medications to help regulate the disease, but you need to know this, medications cause free-radical damage, and this damage is called side effects. All medications can cause side effects. So eating properly to help your condition is absolutely essential for your life. Think of free-radicals as a school of piranha, they feed on everything in sight, they are not picky eaters. Free-radicals cause healthy cells to become mutated or deformed and they attack any cell they come in contact with. Now if they do manage to steal an electron then that once healthy cell, in turn, becomes a free-radical doing what was done to it. This is a vicious cycle, basically there is a war going on inside your body. You can not see or feel this war but it is there, and one day it will show its ugly head in the form of a serious disease or illness. You must be on the defensive and feed your body what it needs in order to combat these little piranhas. Inflammation is a bully, after the free-radicals have done the damage the inflammation is sent by the body to help heal but it is unable to heal mutations and deformities so the deformed or mutated cells begin to feed on the healthy inflammation cells. Now the inflammation cells are deformed or mutated and become chronic inflammation cells, the chronic inflammation cells begin attacking your healthy tissues and cells. You have the power to take your health into your own hands and put a stop to the damage now. As we know anti-oxidants help the body fight against free-radicals, anti-oxidants are molecules or atoms that has an extra electron. It gives this extra electron away and in turn the free-radicals stop attacking healthy cells. Science has proven that ALL diseases and illnesses are caused by free-radical damage and the vast majority have chronic inflammation as their side kick. There are risk factors for all diseases but free-radicals and chronic inflammation are the source and cause of major complications. Free-radicals can not be avoided; they are in air and water pollution, in the junk foods we eat, and caused by traumas and injuries. Free-radicals are a part of life; they even affect the aging process itself. Anti-oxidants are essential for health, plants contain about 1,000 to 1,500 anti-oxidants, a diet of fruits and vegetables is essential, supplements are key, vitamins and minerals contain high numbers of anti-oxidants. You need to do some research and try to find fresh supplements; they tend to lose their potency the longer they sit on the self. Anyone with diabetes or even pre-diabetes must re-think their diets, moving towards fresh and properly cooked foods, stay away from fast foods and anything with high sugar content. Taking in a large number of anti-oxidants everyday, is essential to help your body recover and maintain better overall health. Type 2 diabetes can be controlled with diet and exercise, as long as you begin now. Pre-diabetes can be reversed. There are also super charged, super powerful anti-oxidants in nature called Xanthones. Xanthones have the power to defeat a larger number of free-radicals at one time, due to strong carbon bonds that make the molecule stable. Each Xanthone performs a specific biological function inside the body unlike regular anti-oxidants. Universities and scientists have been studying xanthones for over 20 years. Scientists have found that xanthones are able to relieve a variety of problems and also help in the improvement of serious conditions. This is the reason that more and more universities and scientists are becoming involved in the research on these amazing xanthones. Two hundred xanthones have been identified in nature, and 41 are in the mangosteen fruit alone, you can compare that to the Aloe Vera plant that contains only one xanthone. The mangosteen fruit also contains 25,000 anti-oxidants. How can that help your health? The mangosteen fruit has the highest number of anti-oxidants and xanthones ever found in one source. One thing about xanthones you need to know is that they must be consumed in their natural form. For more information on xanthones you can call toll free 1-888-374-4148 and listen to a message about the mangosteen fruit juice and its powerful medicinal abilities. People with diabetes are ruled by their medications and checking their blood everyday, they must see their doctor on a regular basis in order to keep their blood sugars under control by adjusting their medication. If their sugar goes too far up or too far down, massive damage to the internal organs and tissues is done and even the brain is affected, and can cause comma. This is a very deadly disease, but with the right food intake it dose not have to be, take care of your self.

Diabetes and the menopause

You might be thinking "What's the connection between diabetes and the menopause?" Well, for ladies reaching that certain age, it can be very traumatic - especially when some of the effects experienced can easily be mistaken for those we have to be aware of when managing our diabetes... For a diabetic taking medication, keeping blood sugars at the right level is a balancing act. If sugar levels drop too low, because of not eating enough or at the right times, you suffer a hypoglycemia episode (sometimes called 'hypo' for short). For me, this usually manifests itself as shaking; irritability; sweating and a faint-headed feeling. If you are diabetic and have ever had low-blood sugar you may recognize some of these symptoms, amongst others. A quick 'glucose fix' usually settles it within 5-10 minutes. Now, compare that to some of the symptoms of starting the menopause; hot flushes [I call them 'power-surges' ;)] - similar to the sweats of a hypo; mood swings - akin to the irritability you might experience during a hypo. It's very easy to confuse the symptoms you are feeling. When I first started the menopause, I frequently confused waking at 2 a. m. in the morning in a cold sweat as a hypo and took a quick sugar boost to settle myself. That pushed my blood sugar levels up when I didn't need it. Not a good idea! It was only after visiting my Doctor to talk about these frequent, unexpected hypos I discovered I was starting the menopause (I was in my late 40s, so it was rather unexpected, normally it doesn't occur until early-to-mid 50s). If you are a lady, with diabetes controlled by medication, and you are in your early 50s and you start having frequent, unexplained hypos - check your sugar levels before 'treating the condition'. And get your Doctor to check your symptoms. You may be confusing symptoms of diabetes and the menopause. And guys; if your lady normally has great control of her diabetes and suddenly seems to be showing the same symptoms when she was getting her diabetes into balance (if you knew her then) please be supportive and understanding, she's going through one hell of an experience, but I promise, she will come through and be her normal, loving and charming self once again.

Recommended foods for diabetes

: Brewer’s Yeast Brewer’s yeast is a wonder food. It is rich in traces of mineral chromium. This mineral helps the pancreas produce more insulin. It is one of the best supports for normal handling of sugar by the body. According to an article by Dr. Richard J. Doisy and others, which appeared in the Medical World News, Brewer’s yeast has lowered the insulin requirements of many diabetes patients. Broccoli Broccoli, a close relation of the cauliflower, has long been a popular food in Europe.

This vegetable has proved to be an effective anti-diabetic food. It is rich source of chromium, a trace mineral that seems to lower blood sugar. This trace mineral regulates blood sugar, thereby often reducing the medication and insulin needs of diabetes. In cases of mild diabetes, chromium may prevent the onset of the full-fledged disease. If a person’s glucose tolerance is on border, chromium can help control it. Even low blood sugar levels can be brought to normal with chromium.

Curd Curd injects friendly bacteria in to the digestive system that stimulate the pancreas. It also washes the pancreas of its acids and wastes. These cleansing actions enable the pancreas to perform much better and thereby help in the production of insulin. Garlic In scientific trials garlic and its constituents have been found to lower blood sugar in diabetes. This vegetable is rich in potassium, which effectively replaces the large quantities of potassium lost in the urine of diabetics. It also contains zinc and sulphur, which are constituents of insulin. Some authorities believe that low levels of zinc may be one of the factors responsible for the onset of diabetes. Garlic also contains manganese, a deficiency of which can contribute towards diabetes. Garlic constituents appear to act by blocking the inactivation of insulin in the liver.

The result is higher blood insulin levels and lower blood sugar. Garlic has other benefits for diabetes besides lowering blood sugar. It prevents arteriosclerosis, which is a common complication of diabetes and relieves body paid. Diabetics can take the equivalent of one or two cloves of garlic a day in any form they like, either raw or cooked in food or as capsules. Garlic milk, prepared by adding four cloves of crushed garlic to 110 ml of milk, is one good way of taking garlic. The best way, however, is to chew raw garlic thoroughly first thing in the morning. Bengal Gram Bengal gram, also known as chickpea, is a widely used important component of Indian diet. It is a valuable anti-diabetic food. Experiments have shown that the oral ingestion of the water extract of Bengal gram increases the utilization of glucose in diabetics as well as normal people.

In a study conducted at Central Food Technological Research Institute in Mysore, the requirement of insulin of chronic diabetes patients decreased from 40 units a day to 20 units, when kept on a diet which included liberal supplements of Bengal gram extract. Diabetic patients who are on a restricted diet, which does not severely limit the intake of carbohydrates but includes liberal amounts of Bengal gram extract, have shown considerable improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, glucose tolerance, urinary excretion of sugar and general condition. Bitter Gourd The bitter gourd is a common vegetable cultivated extensively. It has excellent medicinal virtues. This vegetable has been used as fold medicine for diabetes from ancient times. Research has established that it contains insulin like principle designated as plant-insulin, which has been found beneficial in lowering blood and urine sugar levels. Bitter gourd is thus and effective anti-diabetic food and should be included liberally in the diet of a diabetic. Juice of three or four bitter gourds taken every morning on an empty stomach has been found more effective than eating fruits.

The seeds of bitter gourd can be powdered and added to regular meals. A decoction prepared by boiling chopped bitter gourd is water is equally effective, as is its dry powder mixed with liquid foods. Bitter gourd is rich in all essential vitamins and minerals especially vitamins A, B1, B2, C and iron. Its regular use, therefore, prevents many complications associated with diabetes including hypertension, eye complications, neuritis and the defective metabolism of carbohydrates. Black Gram Black gram is a highly prized pulse in India. It is an anti diabetic food. Germinated black gram taken with half a cup of fresh bitter gourd juice, forms and effective remedy for treating mild types of diabetes.

It should be taken once a day, for three to four months, with a restricted intake of carbohydrates. In severe diabetes, regular use of this combination is an effective complement to other treatments. It is also a useful health food for preventing complications due to malnutrition in diabetes. Milk prepared by grinding sprouted whole black gram is also recommended for diabetics.

Groundnut Groundnuts are valuable in diabetes. Eating a handful of groundnuts daily by diabetics will not only prevent malnutrition, particularly the deficiency of niacin, but also checks the development of vascular complications. For diabetes information, diabetes diet, diabetes treatment, diabetes causes visit diabetesmellitus-information. com

How to live with diabetes

One of the most dreaded diseases is diabetes. It is a killer disease and it is really very difficult to control. Going by the official US stats, diabetes is the third biggest giant killer among the deadly diseases in the United States of America. The global statistics is also mind-boggling! First things first, how does a person become diabetic? When your body is unable to produce insulin that is necessary for its normal functioning, it becomes unable to absorb glucose (sugar). When the levels of glucose take a course to the blood stream, you become a diabetic patient. Once you become diabetic, you have a problem for life. You live hour by hour, during the day. Medication becomes part of your life, which is likely to demand a good portion of your pension! Your lifestyle will be changed.

You will suddenly become a thinking man now—thinking about diabetes. You might find your self pronouncing the term diabetes, diabetes, and diabetes hundreds of times a day!! When it has finally seized you, it is not only diabetes alone! Many other dreaded diseases live in waiting to take hold of you. Some of them are kidney failure, heart diseases, nervous breakdown, blindness, blurred vision, limb amputation and the ultimate for the human body—death! The prescriptive medicines complete the remaining process of the damage. Many toxic side effects are reported - skin rashes, weight gain and respiratory ailments, are few to quote. Notwithstanding the claims of many over-the-counter drugs that promise cure, the one thing that can really help you is your diet control and perfect discipline as regards to time management. For example, your morning walks. Now, all the medical practitioners agree that morning walks do great service to tame the intensity of diabetics. So, you need to take a complete brief about the articles of food that is suitable for you, vegetables included! If anything will have the exacting affects to take you out of the influence of this disease, it is nature! So, have a perfect dietary discipline. It has taken many to the path of complete recovery! Some of the local treatments have the intrinsic capacity to tame your high blood sugar and such cases are the only hope for the diabetic patients! So, do not think that everything is lost for you! From the dark ashes, sprouts a seedling!

How to manage your diabetes properly

What if you are diagnosed with diabetes? Are you going to stay indoors and just inject yourself with insulin everyday? Maybe you need to understand the facts about diabetes and accept it wholeheartedly so that it can't be a heavy burden in your part. There are no other alternative for you to eradicate the presence of diabetes in your body once you have been diagnosed with it. You must learn how to deal with the disease because it can certainly kill you once you do not have a proper diabetes diet included in your everyday food intake. Eating the right kind of food and living a healthy lifestyle is the best arsenal that you have to fight diabetes. If you are still groping in the dark on how you can have the right diabetes diet, take a look in the proceeding sections: • Have a regular check of your everyday meal and their nutrients. Remember that your main goal is to avoid all the sugar that you are not allowed to eat. Include in your everyday meal the right amount of healthy foods so that you are right on track of staying healthy in spite of the disease. • Be careful and always check your sugar intake. If you have alternates for sugar-rich foods, then go for it. There are different kinds of sugar replacements in the market, especially if you are planning to bake some cakes and cookies. You can utilize these sugar-free products for your baking purposes. It also tastes delicious and you will enjoy whatever you baked for yourself and at the same time maintaining a good blood sugar level. • The amount of food intake is also important because it can have positive or negative impact in your diet and health. You can seek some suggestions from a physician of how much food you should eat everyday. As long as you follow the right diet for you, them you will stay healthy for the rest of your life.

More aware of diabetes heart disease link

With diabetes on the rise, doctors are extremely concerned about associated risks such as heart disease and stroke, which together kill two out of three people with diabetes. Fortunately, a recent study indicates that more people with diabetes are making the link between diabetes and their increased risk for heart disease and stroke. According to a 2005 awareness survey conducted by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American College of Cardiology (ACC), 45 percent of people with diabetes understand their increased risk for heart disease, which is up from 35 percent in 2001. Experts believe even more awareness is needed, however. The ADA and ACC continue to work together to share important information, tools and resources to encourage people with diabetes-and health care providers-to learn more about the impact of diabetes on the heart. Other findings from the 2005 ADA/ACC awareness survey show: • 69 percent know they may develop high blood pressure (38 percent in 2001). • 64 percent know they are at risk for cholesterol problems (37 percent in 2001). Importantly, more people with diabetes are talking to their health care providers about managing diabetes comprehensively: • 45 percent of people with diabetes now have a goal for blood glucose levels (30 percent in 2003). • 57 percent have a goal for blood pressure (34 percent in 2003). • 61 percent have a goal for cholesterol (34 percent in 2003). These figures are encouraging, but awareness may not be moving fast enough to keep pace with the growing prevalence of diabetes. Recent statistics indicate diabetes has risen by over 14 percent since last estimates in 2003. The need for increased education and awareness about the link between diabetes and heart disease is now more critical than ever. Armed with the best information, people with diabetes can properly manage their diabetes, understand their risks for complications such as heart disease and stroke, and take action to live a longer, healthier life.

Award honors success in fight against diabetes

Ice cream or yogurt? Regular or diet soda? These may not be critical decisions at your dinner table - unless you're one of nearly 18 million Americans living with diabetes today. People with diabetes face daily challenges. To remain healthy, they must monitor their blood sugar levels, eat a balanced diet and exercise regularly. Some people also need to take insulin to stay alive. In an effort to recognize champions of these challenges, Eli Lilly and Co. established the LillyforLife Achievement Award in 2002. The award celebrates the inspiring achievements of people of all ages who live with diabetes. Those recognized do not have to be well known or famous for their achievements but can be everyday people who have accomplished or are working toward exceptional personal success. This year, Lilly has expanded the award program to include not only people with diabetes but also anyone impacted by the condition or involved with the diabetes community.

Categories of submission include: patients age 18 or over; patients age 17 or under; professionals; caretakers or spouses; and journalists. One person from each category will be selected by a panel of judges to receive this special award. Applicants are eligible to apply for one category. Peer or self-nominations are accepted from the public through Aug. 30, 2004.

Last year, Rick Largent was honored with the first ever LillyforLife Achievement Award. Largent has been living with type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes for 25 years. He has faced extraordinary challenges during his life beyond diabetes. An unfortunate accident left him quadriplegic, and he later lost his 19-year-old daughter to cancer.

Largent neglected to control his blood sugar, putting himself at risk for diabetes-related complications. It was not until he began using an insulin pump that he started taking control of his health again. Largent began traveling cross-country sharing his story and teaching others that anything is possible when diabetes is managed well. He also visited Capitol Hill in an effort to educate policymakers on the dual dilemma of diabetes and disabilities. Largent's resilience to conquer diabetes and quadriplegia represents the kind of spirit the LillyforLife Achievement Award stands for. As many who live with diabetes know, if the disease is managed, there's no reason you can't achieve your goals.

Type one diabetes

Type one diabetes is far less common than type two diabetes and it will affect younger individuals. It is most found in people under the age of 40 and mostly under the age of fourteen. There are people who have been diagnosed with it after forty but it is very rare. Diabetes is a serious issues and type one is the worst. It is associated with the lack of insulin. It is a dysfunction of the pancreas where it will just stop making insulin in the amount the body needs to maintain a normal level of glucose in the blood. Many people who have type one diabetes will have symptoms of hyperglycemia.

Hyperglycemia is where your glucose is too high in the blood. Meaning your blood sugar is too high. The common symptoms of hyperglycemia or diabetes type one is frequent hunger, frequent urinating, and frequent thirst. You will also experience blurred vision, fatigue, weight loss, your healing power will be low (meaning it will take you a long time to heal a wound or cut), dry mouth, dry or itchy skin, and you could have impotence for males. Your immune system will become weak and you will be able to pick up infection easily. The reason why you are always hungry is because your body can not use glucose as an energy source.

It is also, why you tire out easily. Since the body can not absorb sugar or glucose into the blood cells you will release it through frequent trips to the bathroom. Since you make many trips a day to the bathroom, your body realizes that it is losing excess water and that’s why you will become thirsty. When it comes to the symptoms, you may experience them all together or it may take some time for your body to go through the process. Most likely though it will be gradual. The changes of developing type one diabetes is 3.7 to 20 per 100, 000. Over 700,000 Americans have type one diabetes, which adds up to be about ten percent of the total population that has the disorder.

It is more common to have type two diabetes. The reason why people develop the disorder is because an autoimmune disorder. The body will start to see it’s own tissue as a foreign object and then it destroys the body’s ability to make insulin. It has been rumored to be a cause from the mumps, rubella, measles, influenza, polio, or other viruses. That’s why it is very common in young children because those epidemics affect younger children more often than older adults. Diabetes is also genetic. You may simply have the disorder because an immediate family member has it. As for treatment, type one involves injections of insulin. It is absorbed in the blood stream and absorbed by the cells that need insulin and it will then control the levels of sugar in the blood. You can find more information on http:// all-about-diabetes-symptom. com/

Diabetes and your mouth

: We diabetics have to pay even more attention to our teeth and gums than other people. We are at greater risk of cavities, gum disease and tooth infections. Not only that, but those infections can cause our blood sugar to rise, so it becomes a vicious cycle. Here are some mouth problems common in diabetics. Plaque Plaque is, of course, a problem for many people, not just diabetics.

But it's caused by starches and sugars, and of course we have more than our share of those! So diabetics are highly prone to plaque. Dry mouth Sometimes my mouth is so dry in the morning I can hardly speak—I'm sure you know how that feels. But it's more than just inconvenient, it's dangerous to the health of our mouths. You see, saliva washes away many of the bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease. Dry mouth cuts the amount of saliva available for this job, so the result is more cavities and gum disease. Dry mouth sometimes also creates inflammation of the soft tissue in the mouth, making eating difficult and unpleasant.

While there are artificial saliva substitutes, which your dentist can tell you about, you can usually stimulate your own saliva by sucking on a sugar-free hard candy. I like no-sugar-added Ricola for this purpose. And of course, drinking water helps. Fungal infections Not only do we diabetics have less saliva than we need, but the saliva we do have is high in sugar content, so it's double trouble for us. This can cause a fungal infection called candiasis, commonly known as thrush. It produces sore red or white spots in the mouth.

Medication can help though, so ask your dentist. As a diabetic, you must pay great attention to oral hygiene. Brush your teeth twice a day, and floss daily. Examine your gums for signs of problems—and always visit your dentist at least twice a year.

[ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ]